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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
No guarantee ofcourse,but you might get a pleasant surprise on that going against the grain thing. :D
From your lips.....(y)
This stuff is way over my head but doesn't WIS doc GF27.51-P-5200W,the one they refer to in the doc describing the clearance adjustment of the multidisk brakes lists B1 consisting of 4 internally toothed plates and 4 externally toothed plates? Together 8?
Or am I reading this completely wrong? Like I said,way out of my league and sorry if I may cause any confusion.Just curious and trying to learn.....;)
Actually, you raised a good point. In that document you referred to it shows 8 disks total for the B1 - and that means my car is not an oddball - that is the standard compliment. So that's a valid point and one I missed.

But in the actual clearance spec section, ar27.51-p-7229w, in the section for the 722.9 for the B1, they state "the number of multiple disks 3,4 or 5" so 6,7 and 8 are missing :mad:

But you raised a really good point, and it's important. MB says it has 8 disks in the document you referred to. So that is the standard compliment. That information leads me to believe MB has a documentation error with respect to the clearances, which is bad for me...

So your information is useful, but it's leading me to thinking it's a documentation error. I always seem to run into this stuff. I don't know how many thousands of 722.9's have been rebuilt at this point, but just how are they setting the clearance on the B1.....I think I can guess....I bet most shops don't check any of the clearances and just slam a new set of clutches in....and call it good.
 
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Discussion Starter · #42 · (Edited)
Well, another day, another interesting issue with the trans rebuild. Turns out, it's not just the B1 clutch freeplay specs that are not available for an 8 disk stack, it's also the K1 specs. Turns out, the K1 also has 8 frictions and the specs only go to 6.....

So...I'm ready to draw some conclusions from this effort to blueprint the 722.906....

First, since the one adjustment snap ring I ordered from MB (so far) had to come from Germany - clearly no-one is adjusting the gap on the clutch stacks during a rebuild because...it would be a common stocked item (ie local).

Second, Mercedes does show 8 frictions for both the B1 and K1 in WIS for this transmission. We can infer from that that MB is fully aware this is how they built them and will even tell you that is how many you must have...

Third, Mercedes specs for the gap stop at 5 frictions for the B1 and 6 frictions for the K1. As such, they forgot to document the spec for the 8 clutch stack, probably due to a production change that they forgot to incorporate into WIS....

Fourth, and in my opinion, most damning, is that no-one in the transmission rebuilding industry, including ATRA, has run into this. We can infer some really important things from that. One of which is that obviously, NONE of the rebuilders are checking/measuring the clutch gap. Instead, what they are likely doing is slamming a set of clutches in it and sending it out the door! Good enough, right?

Not taking into account, of course, that the clutches they are using are not going to be identical thickness, whether you buy them from Mercedes or whomever. There are manufacturing tolerances that tend to, if you'll forgive the expression, stack up.....right to the point where they cause problems with a transmission that is supposed to 'self-adapt' and can only 'self-adapt' within a certain range....

Where this gets to be vital, is when you are doing a 'diagnosis by exclusion' ie, you have a 3-2 coast down clunk and Xentry logs from the TCU indicate that it can no longer adjust B1....and you want to ensure the clutch stack gap is properly adjusted...ie, to exclude that from causing the issue......which just happens to be what I'm trying to do...

Anyway, updated parts should arrive on Thursday. At that point I'll have to decide what to do. If I didn't care about the clutch stack height and the incoming parts, I could have easily had it ready to go back into the car....today!!

But...what never ceases to amaze me is how fast people will run away when presented with an issue like this. Otherwise knowledgeable people...just disappear. My guess is that no-one is going to fess up that they just threw clutches in during the rebuild and never bothered to check the actual clearance of the stack to see if it's in spec. That would be like rebuilding an engine and not bothering to check the main bearing or rod bearing clearance....and then expecting it to be 400,000 mile engine.

Please excuse the sarcasm. I get angry when I learn of industry-wide issues like this. It's very telling as to the quality of the work being done out there. I have no problem with charging good money for good work, I can explain that every time and back it with a real warranty, but when I see that no-one appears to be checking the clutch gap during a rebuild, which tends to be expensive...it starts to grate on me.
 
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Hi Marvin, following you with much interest. I am really shocked at the lack of info available and obvious shoddy work being done by MB and others on such a good Box. Have checked here and so far have been met with BLANK faces when asked for these clearance figures........... I am still waiting for the promised return contact with the specs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
I was finally able to determine the answer after speaking with a long time German mechanic that had done many 722.9's back in the day....and done them properly. Just so we're clear, of all the places and people I asked, throughout the entire industry, only one person in the entire world could actually answer it for me...

The answer is this, with respect to the K1 and B1, you take the number of disks present, divide them by 2, and then use that figure in the chart. So if you have 8 frictions total, you use the spec for 4 frictions (!!!!), and aim for the middle of the clearance spec.

If you have 6 frictions total, you consider them to be 3.....

In my case, I have 8 B1 friction disks total. So the spec for 4 is between 2.20 => 2.60 mm gap. So you aim for the middle, 2.40 mm

It's very silly, but this is how they look at it, and I've ridiculed them at length in another thread on the site :) Suffice to say, I have my answer. I won't go into detail on why they think like that because I don't understand it with 100% clarity. Basically, 4 of the disks do the braking and so they refer to it in the chart as 4 multi-disks, even though there are 8......

Something like that. From my perspective, it's insanity. But....I have my answer and the work can go on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 · (Edited)
Measured 5 stacks today with 2 more tomorrow. At that point I'll know exactly how many custom retaining rings I need to buy.

Of interest is the amount of pressure needed to apply to the clutch stack when measuring. Mercedes makes a custom tool for this, I looked into it but passed since the best price I could find was $600 USD and I believe you need to buy the anvils after that.

If you look at the tool, and understand how it works, and see how it's graduated, it looks to me like they want ~1mm of compression on the stack when you measure it. This makes sense to me so that is how I have been measuring the gaps, with enough pressure by hand (fingers) to mimic the pressure they want to see, which of course, varies according to each stack....

It's also important to have the retaining ring sitting at the top of the groove and to measure them in several places as this way you can tell you if there are other issues....

What I found to be the smart play was to activate the piston and stack, where possible, with compressed air. I did this repeatedly to seat the stack and it also will let you know, for a fact, that the L-shaped return spring is properly and firmly seated. Mercedes uses that special tool to compress the stack when seating those rings, which is the ideal way to go because they would fall into perfect position. When you do it yourself you are kind of wedging them into place so you don't get to hear a perfect snap that you would with the tool.

I chose a different path on gap than what was recommended to me. Instead of aiming for the median of the spec I am aiming for the tight end of the spec. The method to my madness is based on this understanding....which is solely my own... o_O
  • The TCU adjusts the stacks over time to account for clutch wear
  • The gap spec provided by Mercedes should take that into account and be a range the TCU can work with
  • My clutches are new and break in may remove some 'fuzz' resulting in more clearance
  • A tighter gap will allow the TCU to adjust the stacks for a longer period of time because the gap will increase over time, therefore, a tighter gap should equal more kilometers of adjustment over the life of the new transmission
The log I took from the TCU prior to teardown showed issues with B1 filling times. The TCU was reporting -20. When you see -20 it indicates maxxed out fill times that can no longer be adjusted. I wish I measured the gaps during teardown but I did eyeball the B1 and it was a large gap. Significant. You could slap it back & forth o_O

The flip side is, because I have to order new custom sized retaining rings, why not aim for the tight side? Why waste future adjustability? In my mind, build that in now for the same price. This may also make for snappier shifts due to a shortened engagement time, but we will see. Either way, it should be able to be manually adapted in DAS and auto-adjust because the stacks are in the permissible range.

Of the 5 of 7 (?) stacks measured so far, only one was in spec. The vast majority so far are too tight, not enough gap, and thus requiring thinner retaining rings. There is one flyer in there that needs a little more gap. Of course the readings now make sense because I understand MB's screwy specs for some of the stacks....(y)

Bear in mind, my frictions are Raybestos, and not OE Mercedes, so it's easily possible they are a little thicker than OE. They are also fully soaked but there are also new pistons installed and the updated L-shaped snap rings for B1 and B3 so...things are different. The conclusion I would draw from this, though, is that measuring the gap on the clutch stacks is essential.

Of all the youtube videos I have watched of people rebuilding these transmissions, and some of them are done by very good shops, I have yet to see anyone measure a stack. Not one.

In order for that stack to be in spec, first MB would have to have nailed it when they first assembled the trans, then the rebuilder would have had to use a piston of literal identical size, as well as frictions that are exactly the same size as the originals, when new, and there would have to be zero wear on the return spring etc. In other words, not possible. Production tolerances, wear, and stackup of tolerances would all come into play.

Anyway, the reason I am being anal about this is, as mentioned, part of a diagnosis by exclusion with respect to my 3-2 coast down clunk. I need to know that the clutch stacks are perfect with respect to adjustment range should the problem persist. I suspect it won't, but I don't want to have to go back in again. One & done, please, if at all possible.

Don't know if anyone is actually reading this stuff, likely because the people here will never rebuild a 722.906, but I suspect this thread will be helpful for others on the Internet... because someone will.

Now it's off to see if those custom sized retaining rings that I need are in North America or Germany....if people really are measuring the clutch stacks they will be local...but I doubt it....

Here's a K2 stack being measured.

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Tread
 

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Don't know if anyone is actually reading this stuff, likely because the people here will never rebuild a 722.906, but I suspect this thread will be helpful for others on the Internet... because someone will.
I for one am. I got 2 left hands so I probably will never perform this taks but I am always interested in the technical stuff. So yeah,keep on writing. 👍
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
Fun & Games Part II

OK, so just to recap, each of the 7 clutch stacks have to have the gap set correctly. The gap is measured between the retaining ring and the pressure plate (the two pieces in the top of this picture) You slide a feeler gage between the snap ring at the top and the pressure plate just beneath and measure your gap. In order to adjust the gap you order a new retaining ring of a predetermined thickness.

So..if your gap is 1mm and it should be 2mm then the ring you have is too thick and you need to order one that is 1 mm thinner than your existing ring. Get it?

Wheel Tire Automotive tire Bicycle part Tread


So what I'm doing right now is trying to find out what the gaps are on all 7 stacks so that I can determine what rings to order in. It's a pain in the rear but, as mentioned, if I want the TCU to be able to adapt them all properly, then you want each of the 7 stacks to be properly adjusted.

The pain comes in because you basically have to do half the job right off the bat and then order the parts and drop everything until they come in.

Anyway, in the stack pictured above, I installed new frictions (the actual clutches) and new steels which I bought from Raybestos Powertrain ahead of time. In the stack above there are 5 frictions and 5 steels. So how many frictions do I find soaking my oil bath? You guessed it, 4....hmm...that's odd....

Now how can that be? So I checked my order from Raybestos to get the part number of the friction kit I have and then looked at their site to see what it includes. For the BR clutch above, the kit comes with 5. Yet I have 4. Now, I didn't lose one, I pulled them all from the kit and put them straight in the oil bath with a lid on it. Right from the package into the bath.....

So...at this time feel compelled to post another video. This time, Jean Luc is the person at Raybestos Powertrain...you know, the one that's supposed to put 5 of those disks in the kit but insists there are 4 !!!


It think we've seen this picture before....now, it's not like I can just go down to the local Raybestos branch and pick up ONE disk. After all, I live on an island on the left hand side of Canada - and these parts came from San Antonio, Texas...

So what's a guy to do? Well, I do have the old Mercedes frictions from 2006 with 175,000k on them....Anyway, I measured each of them and chose the thickest one and put it right at the very bottom of the stack so that I will never have to see it. I can pretend it doesn't exist :unsure:

So....anyway....to find out what retaining rings I need for the clutches you have to assemble them all. This includes the BR pictured above which has to sit deep in the case at the far rear. You then jam your arm down there with a bunch of feeler gages and a flashlight to determine what the gap is 🤪

But the case is dirty as I haven't cleaned it yet. I was thinking about bringing it up to the tranny shop to get them to clean it but why bother? You can just buy a case of Brake Kleen for $39 because I knew I was going to need it anyway. This turned out to be a really smart plan because a case should be just about perfect. Here's a picture for you...you know....just in case...:p

Bottle cap Bottle Liquid Drinkware Fluid


This is a shot of the case after cleaning. Its magnesium so it always looks a little dingy but I can assure you, it's clean. Brake clean.

Grey Circle Tints and shades Symmetry Monochrome


Speaking of which, do you see that bearing at the rear of the case? I popped it out using the special Mercedes tool, which, in this case (oops) meant using a long 3/8 extension and a hammer.

And this is the important part, that bearing was shot. And I do mean shot. Do you remember at the start of this I could not get the yoke off the rear of the transmission? That is odd, because in every video of someone tearing these down they pull it off by hand....You're not supposed to need a puller to remove it. Because it was odd I paid a lot of attention to that area. There was rust behind the seal, inside of the transmission, on the tailshaft.

This meant water was getting in there, which for the life of me I cannot understand. One, the rear of the transmission is NOT located in a place where it should even see water. Two, there is a seal there, you know, to keep the oil in and the water out....Three, is was clear that no oil was getting up to the rear of the shaft. It was dry. Hence the rust. Again, this is on the inside of the transmission before the seal. This is concerning. The seal is there to keep the oil in, of which, clearly, there is none, and to keep things out. But the seal really should be lubricated by some oil. Otherwise it dries out and burns out. Which in my case (oops) clearly doesn't matter because no oil was getting there to leak out in the first place!

Anyway, that bearing was shot. As you can imagine. It's never had oil on it. It certainly had no grease on it. So it's been spinning around and around for 175,000 km's just as dry as a bone. I think I found a source of some noise! My hopes are that the updated parts coming from Mercedes (tomorrow) have new/redesigned oil passages to get some oil up there. Either way, I will be coating the shaft with trans gel and the bearing too. I'm glad I bought a new OE bearing from MB, even if the old one was made in...Portugal. Regardless, I don't think there is anything I can do about it. I can't pack it with wheel bearing grease because that would not be good if it got in the transmission. Trans gel is the only thing I can think of but it dissolves at operating temperature. My only hope seems to be that the incoming parts were redesigned with respect to oil passages.

Anyway, here's a shot of the BR stack test fitted in the case so that I can finally determine the gap on the stack. Turns out, it was way out...

Eye Flash photography Circle Symmetry Pattern


Anyway, all of this work that you have seen is not really geared (ooops) towards the actual rebuilding of the transmission. All of it so far has been assembled mostly on the basis of determining the proper sized rings I need for the gap on the clutch stacks.

It's a good thing this transmission is very easy to overhaul. Because I'm kind of doing it all twice, the smart play, because of all the time it takes to get parts in, would be to just strip it all again (once they all show up) and rebuild it top to bottom to be sure I didn't miss anything. It really is a very simple transmission from a rebuilding standpoint. All the time is spent on two areas, one is the valve body/solenoids/conductor plate assembly (one full day, for sure) and determining the clutch gaps so that you can order the correct rings. Because of the huge delay in parts arrival (over here) it's very frustrating to be stuck for cheap snap rings, but I knew that going in.

I have yet to hear back from the MB dealer in Maryland that I use as to what the availability is on the 6 rings I need. If they say Germany than you can be 100% certain that no rebuilders are bothering with setting the clutch pack gaps. In my case, of the 7 stacks, only one was in spec. The rest were typically out by a great deal. Ie, I had to order the thinnest or thickest rings that they make to bring the stacks back in spec. So this was not a case of being close enough.

I have been thinking a lot about startup. The fact is, the rebuild is mostly done. I'm just stuck for parts. The second the snap rings show up, it's a 5 minute job to install them. 30 if you recheck them all, and I will. And that brings me to oil. How much oil to put in it during startup and preventing a dry start for those first few moments.

It should take 10 liters since its dry. And I mean dry. I've used trans gel on bearings and bearing surfaces during the build. I'm tossing around the idea of pouring a litre or two over all the parts, if that works and doesn't result in a mess. The valve body is 100% dry. Not the best way to do it, but my thinking is 2L in the torque converter (apparently it holds 4) and 6L in the trans prior to start. The idea being that 6L in the pan should totally submerge the valve body. That would give me 8L total. My gut says that's on the low side. It might be better to shoot for 3L in the converter and 6L in the pan giving me 9 total. That ought to be enough to run it for 30 mins or so until it gets up to temperature to really check the oil. But then, the cooler and lines should also be out of oil. Hmmmm.....it makes me wonder just how much you can put in there before it starts leaking out somewhere, probably the shifter seal?

Btw, there is a whole issue with respect to the converter mating to the engine that I will cover when the time comes. Turns out, when you put the trans back in, the pilot bearing needs to be spotless, the nub on the converter needs to be spotless, the convertor has to be perfectly seated etc. This comes back to the history these transmissions have of destroying the pump. Many shops have put in new pumps during a rebuild and had them fail....during the test drive....That is why I put the pump plate in and why I measured the pump bushing to converter hub clearance. It's absolutely critical. But if you think about it, the pump plate changes the geometry just a tad. It means the pump will be sitting a little further out then it normally would. That also means the seal will ride in a different spot. Those are not bad things, just things you have to take into account. The protection that the pump plate offers is worth it in my book.

Anyway, if the rings have to come from Germany than I think I should huck a strut in the car just to do something different. I'm also still negotiating with China on that Xtrons stereo unit. Another $30 off and I'll buy it and add it to the list! Might as well get it all done and then be done. Hopefully for years!
 

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Could you please do a short YT video on the measuring of the gap? I'm a bit confused to what you're talking about regarding those rings you're waiting for.


As for that bearing/seal being bone dry, is there a oil channel "somewhere" that's clogged up maybe?
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
I probably could, it would not be hard to do (the video) and it's very simple but you're right, a video would make it easy to follow. I don't know how that bearing is supposed to get oil. Whether it's pressure or splashed with oil but I will look into it more closely during assembly.
 
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Discussion Starter · #54 · (Edited)
The Gong Show Continues

Since I'm stuck for parts on the transmission I thought I would chip away at the pile of parts on the other counter and try and make some space. The biggest boxes are the front struts so if I can get rid of those it will put a significant dent in the pile and reclaim a lot of space.

The strut came out easy, very quickly so I thought I would finally be able to make some good time. I bought a new strut spring compressor prior to doing this job so it was time to take it out and see how it worked.

Compressing the spring for removal was a dream. This compressor is solid. When it came time to remove the top nut I found that you need to hold the shaft with an allen key. I didn't have the right size so I went into town to buy another metric set, this one with larger sizes.

Come back and find that a 6 is too small and an 8 is too large. That leaves a 7. Set doesn't come with a 7...so back to the parts store and I look at the other kits. All of them have a 6 and an 8 but no 7..... I asked them what they had against 7's? What did 7 ever do to you?? Anyway, they found ONE kit of the several they had that actually had a 7. So back at it.

Armed with my new 7mm allen wrench I found that I could not get a wrench in to turn the nut while holding the shaft. Turns out, my Oxygen sensor socket would work. The stock nut was 21mm and the new Sachs nut was 22. Even though it was a sloppy fit on the 21 it was perfect for the 22 nut and it all worked.

Those two trips to the parts store killed about an hour so my hopes of making time were slipping. I put the new strut mount together and the new shaft cover and got ready to compress the spring. That's where the fun really began. Turns out, my new strut compressor, while excellent, is tough to use for reassembly. I spent at least an hour trying to figure out exactly how to position the strut and the spring in the compressor in order to make it work. This is all made much harder by the lower spring retainer on the strut being on a serious angle.

It was then that I was reminded of the times, when I was younger, and I managed to launch a fully compressed spring across the shop 🤪 There's a reason, even with a solid tool like this one, I point the end of the barrel in a safe direction as a course of habit. Anyway, sure enough....during one of my test fit sessions I had the spring FULLY compressed and BLAMMO - off it went! It put a pretty good dent in the fridge before bouncing off to the side. I couldn't help but laugh. I still got it !! :p

Anyway, for the reader's sake, those springs are under a LOT of pressure and when they release they will easily kill you. Take your leg right off, you name it. I've been there before, and like I said, I always aim them in the right direction. It wasn't a tool failure, per se, but you could say it was a tool failure... :unsure: So don't take it lightly. Anyway, fortunately after it bounced off the fridge it stopped just short of going through the passenger side door. But the fridge ain't lookin' as it good as it used to. Oh no.

Anyway, if anyone out there is using a similar style compressor, I took a picture of how it needs to be seated in the compressor to make it work. This will save a lot of time when I do the other side tomorrow as this is what took a lot of time to figure out. Also, you can see that it's very compressed. (There's a reason I bought that specific compressor, it was more for other cars than the SLK so I knew I would have to make it work).

Coil spring Camera accessory Gas Automotive tire Shock absorber


The original strut still returned after manually compressing it. The upper strut mount was still fine. That's after 175,000 kilometers. But...the original shock was much slower to return. Regardless, it's in now!

Light Automotive tire Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Fender


On this side the sway bar link was also great. I'm thinking all of my clunking was due to the control arms. I hope I don't regret purchasing the struts, the last thing I want is a stiffer ride. I've got it just right....with the old ones. We'll see.

So...tomorrow I'll get the other one in and that will put a serious dent in the parts pile and free up space.

The other new is.....I bought the new stereo that I was humming and hawing about. I also got the HD backup camera to go with it and the wireless option so I don't have to route a cable from the trunk to the front. If I'm going to go to all the effort of rebuilding the transmission and the suspension, might as well go full blown masochist since I have the 7.1 Harmon Kardon Fiber Optic Ring...but I've got a feeling when my assistant calls in my parts order tomorrow I'm going to be told they are all coming from Germany (the snap rings) so I could well have 4 weeks of time doing nothing. Might as well put that time to good use....

Here's some eye candy for you;

Gadget Communication Device Font Screenshot Display device


Font Technology Electric blue Gadget Display device


Font Screenshot Communication Device Gadget Technology


Gadget Font Audio equipment Output device Electronic device


Azure Font Gesture Gadget Line


Font Gadget Screenshot Technology Electronic device


Light Product Font Advertising Electric blue


Gadget Gesture Font Fin Flat panel display
 
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Discussion Starter · #55 · (Edited)
..and a bit more eye candy (it's got to be better than reading all my verbiage, I'm sure)

Mobile phone Telephony Portable communications device Mobile device Communication Device


Product World Font Line Technology

Light Product Communication Device Gadget Font

Wheel Car Tire Land vehicle Vehicle


Product Audio equipment Font Electronic device Technology


Plant Automotive design Gesture Font Gadget


Communication Device Gadget Font Mobile device Display device


Font Audio equipment Gadget Machine Screenshot


Output device Product Gadget Font Display device


Product Automotive tire Flash photography Font Auto part



Wow, when I see all that, I just know that stereo is going to get me laid!! 🤪🤣 The girls at the Horton's drive through don't stand a chance!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #56 · (Edited)
But that's not all !!!

Font Gadget Electric blue Display device Electronic device


Font Screenshot Science Software Space


World Rectangle Line Font Urban design


Font Parallel Rectangle Darkness Pattern


Yes, when I receive it, I will be full of happiness 🤣:ROFLMAO:

......that is....until I start installing it....then I may be full of things other than happiness. But...we shall see. I am encouraged by posts from others here I've talked to about their Chinese head units. I have to use the Fiber adapter, so there's that. And...I really love the stock stereo. It is the best stereo I have ever heard in a car, period. And...I don't even mind the navigation system either.

But I've never had a glovebox, because someone stuck a 6 disk changer in it. It's very cool, I have nothing against it, but I have never used the glovebox. So it's going to be removed and I have the fiber adapters for that. But this is the thing, and this is critical, I want the ability to go back to stock should this not pan out or meet my approval. And that is how it will be done. I will never sell off the stock unit(s). I am THAT impressed with the sound. But if I can keep that sound, and add more modern features, then that would be a big win. Now if only I could run Xentry/DAS on it that would be ideal! But I'll settle for seeing ALL my steering wheel controls finally work. It's rather annoying seeing a message telling you your phone is not installed.
 
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Awesome!

Do you mind splitting up those two last posts into "Winter Work - Struts and suspension" and "Winter Work - Xtron Head Unit"? That way it'll be easier for future readers to find it and, most importantly, to follow! The gearbox thread is going to be A LONG one before you're done :).

Don't worry, I will read and follow those new threads with almost as much interest. Well, I've already done my "struts and suspension" so maybe not that one :D :D.
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
I don't think it's going to be that long :) If I had the parts I could fire it together very quickly.....

A light day today and some progress....

First, ALL the snap rings were ordered, and yes, they have to come out of Germany. However, that should be the last of the trans parts, so that's huge. Second, I got the last strut done and it went very quickly since I now have a 7mm Allen key and know how to orient the strut in the compressor. I just referenced my pic from yesterday and nailed it on the first shot. This time I didn't launch the spring either :)

That made a HUGE dent in the parts pile so I spent the rest of the easy afternoon just cleaning up and de-boxing the control arms, sway bar links and the 4 adjustable bolts. The idea being that tomorrow, if I'm willing, I can have another easy day and finish the front end completely (with the exception of tightening up the control arms).

At that point, more/less, I have only the rear suspension left. That's pretty good progress. In fact, as I was thinking about it, I realized that I will actually, and probably in short order, run out of work. Good thing I ordered in the stereo because it's easily possible I would be sitting on my hands waiting for the snap rings.

On the rear, there are a plethora of metal arms that need to be installed but....I am also doing the rear wheel bearings while I'm there so that will be a bit extra as well as the bushings that are in the rear hub/carrier. So I'm anticipating a bit of work on the rear. But....I think a light day tomorrow, maybe 3 hours, will complete the entire front end. Because I'm space constrained by a small garage anything I can do to create more space creates a much nicer work environment.

Also.....I was planning on buying 4 new tires but.....the fronts have a lot of tread left. They will certainly outlast a new set of rears. So I'm thinking I will just put rears on it, and that will save me a lot of loot.

In all, very pleased today and very pleased with that strut spring compressor.
 

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Remember, rubber age! It's not about amount of thread left, it's about how old the rubber is.

All tyres are marked with year and week they where manufactured. Tyres older than two, three years of age should be discarded and replaced. The softer (or .. "racier") the tyre, the sooner it should be replaced - that rubber ages faster..
 
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