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Minion
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not sure I believe this-but I have to ask.

You know that ever so enthusiastic car junkie I have at work? The same guy that convinced me not to change the color of the slk? He see's the spyder headlights I ordered today and he says to me..

"you get new lights? sweet! when you detail the car you wax them right? you should..it protects and provides an added layer over time".

Wouldn't waxing your lights strip the uv protection that's already on there? This one has me stumped.
 

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Minion
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Discussion Starter #3
This UV coating discussion goes back to my headlight restoration thread and how I cleaned them with toothpaste and a toothbrush and THEN.. Mensra mentioned I had probably cleaned off a protective coating.

So after I purchased the sylvania headlight restoration kit, it did come with the UV oil to cure as the last step.
 

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mmmmmmmmmm oil.....like salad dressing?
 

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1 oz. UV Block Clear Coat...is this what you put on the headlight?
 

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17. Do car waxes provide real UV protection?

Some waxes do contain UV-protection agents, but the amount of protection that a microscopically thin layer of wax can provide is limited

The primary goal of a wax is to protect the top layers of paint that contain UV-protection agents from the paint manufacture. If you wash and wax your car regularly, your paint will be protected and you should suffer no major UV damage over the normal course of the life of the car.

Don't be fooled by some companies that lead you to believe that it is the UV protection in a wax that protects your car's finish from fading and failure, this is dishonest and simply not true. Taking care of the paint you presently have will go further to protect your finish than relying on protection supplied by a liquid you pour out of a bottle, or a wax you scoop out of a can. UV protection in a car wax formula is only an extra-dose of preventative maintenance, not the end-all, cure-all that some companies would lead you to believe.

UV protection for paint is much different from UV blocking ingredients for human skin. The two formulas are nothing alike and work in drastically different ways. There is no correlation between the ratings applied to the different levels of sun blocking protection for products intended for use on human skin and the ingredients available for use in an automotive wax formula. Sad to say, much of what you see advertised about the protective qualities of most car care products on the market today is simply over-exaggerated hype used to separate you from your hard earned dollars.

So I would think waxing your headlights, like my waxing my windshield (for different reasons, I like the smoothness) would add minimal uv protection back
 

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I just use 303 on ALL the plastics, including the headlight covers. It DOES offer UV protection.
 

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Right, similar to the 303, some sealants provide UV protection and are formuated specifically to provide that function in additon to their other protection and reflective abilities. If UV protection was a design-point, most make the statement on the label or in FAQs on their website. As an adjunct to Jeff's extract, many carnauba waxes however, don't have specific UV protectants formulated into them, so how much UV protection you get is a point of debate depending on the wax and its application, even if its been freshly applied. Polymers tend to last longer than carnauba waxes before another application is required when your ride is out in the elements, so they are probably also a safer bet on longer UV protection if they had it to begin with, because of their durability ...but if you wax a lot, maybe that differentiation point goes away. Lots of supposition to this topic I think, and no generic right answer.

To your question about if waxing is going to cause a problem with your headlights or strip something away, the answer is no. As long as you don't use an AIO or some sort of polish that is designed to eat away or "clean" the finish, you really dont have a chance of creating a problem. Pure waxes and sealants don't do any cleaning or abrasion of your surface, only put a layer of protection over what's there. That's why for example, you had your finish clayed to remove contaminants before laying down the layer of protection your detailer recently did. The clay did the minimal cleaning before the protectant was applied.

FWIW, I'm a Zaino (polymer/sealant) guy, and have been since the mid 90's. It's formulation specifically includes UV protection. My head and tail lights generally get a coat whenever my finish gets another 1-3 layers ...but, Chicky, I really don't do that because of UV protection of my headlights ... I do it because I like the way the water beads up and moves across my lenses when it rains, and it makes things that much simpler during the weekly wash to ensure no water spots collect on them ...UV protection is a nice by-product to what I do.
 

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Headlight protectant... a cautionary tale. Ok, I use Meguiar's Headlight Protectant as I have seen way too many cars with the yellow haze highlight lenses.. Mercedes included. To date, the product has worked well. However... DO follow the instructions and remove the residue PROMPTLY! I applied it one nice day to first one and then the other headlight. At that point " She Whom Must Be Obeyed" needed my car out of the way so I parked it temporarily in the sun... and then got involved in something else. A half hour later, when I moved my SLK back into it's hanger, there were the foggy headlights staring me back in the face. First I tried buffing them out with a clean micro-cloth, to no great effect. Then, reasoning that an additional coat might soften up the first application... fail! There was nothing for it except to return to the auto shop and seek advice... which was not forthcoming as they didn't know what to recommend in this situation. So... I purchased Meguiar's PlastX, which is more of a restoration product than protectant. With due diligence, lot's of elbow grease and time, I managed to restore my headlights to their former crystal clarity. Lesson learned, the hard way, as usual.
 

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Optimum Lens Coating for your headlights.
http://www.optimumcarcare.com/olc.php?li=10

Much like the famous Opti-Coat for your paint, it is a permanent coating that doesn't wash of fade off. To remove it, you actually need to buff it off with a light abrasive polish.

It contains much higher UV inhibitors than the paint variation for the sole purpose of preventing additional fade on your headlights. Especially necessary after they have been polished (if they were yellow and faded before, and you restored them).
 
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