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Extreme crosswind landings can be terrifying, and yesterday, pilots in the Netherlands were thrown into the crucible when the worst storm in 100 years rocked Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport with winds up to 75 miles per hour. This incredible video shows a KLM 777-300ER pitching and rolling until the last possible second.


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Landings like that at Denver's old downtown airport - were pretty common like that! Very scary the first couple times - after that you had every confidence that the Pilots knew what they were doing.. Then it became fun to watch the faces of the "First Timers"... LOL

FWIW,
Carl B.
 

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Could one of our resident pilots tell me if that is a manual landing? What's the norm in those situations?
All looks a bit scary to me!
 

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Until JJ or one of our other pilots responds

But pilot, blogger and author Patrick Smith wasn't fazed by the clip.

"My first reaction after watching the video was, 'That's it?'" he said. "This is typical of the way these things are typically scooped up by the Internet and sensationalized."

"It looks fairly dramatic, but it was not dangerous," he reassured us. Videos of landings tend to look a lot more dramatic than they actually are. Those judders and swerves? Just normal reactions to gusty crosswinds.

"For the passengers on board, I'm sure there was some jostling, but the plane didn't come anywhere close to crashing," he says.

For example, you may have noticed that the plane tilts to its right just before it touches down. It looks like it comes close to flipping over into a fireball of death. Actually, Smith says, that's a deliberate correction to the crosswind. Pilots are trained to land at an angle, so the wheels closest to the wind land first. That helps stop the wind from pushing the plane sideways across the runway.

"That landing was well within the capabilities of the pilots and also the aircraft," Smith stresses.

Pilots are trained to abort landings if they feel unsafe, and they don't lose face among the crew for doing so, he says.

KLM did not immediately respond to a request for comment, but told CNBC that its pilots "applied the relevant procedures" in the face of the storm. "KLM pilots were well able to deal with it and ensure the safety of passengers and crew."

Nervous flyers of YouTube, you can officially relax.
 
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