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Discussion Starter #1
Thought it would be nice to share some pics of our bikes and chat a little about riding.
So here we go.
My T100 that I totalled a year ago and was the reason I dived into the slk world.

My Moto Guzzi V7 that replaced the T100

The good old reliable AX1 that I share with my wife

And my never ending project Honda


Care to share yours?

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Great Idea Charlie

Here are my current rides( Harley Davidson Street Glide Special and Softail Breakout, and one previous ride Harley Fatboy.
I also had the following
Honda valkyrie 1600
Honda CBR1100XX
Honda VTR1000
Honda CBR600R
Kwaka ZZR600
Kwaka Vulkan 1500
Kwaka ZZR250
And a few off road bikes and Quads
 

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Discussion Starter #4
@xlr8it
How was the Valkyrie riding feeling?
And in terms of home maintenance was it easy to fix?
They come really cheap these days and I am thinking of slashing one to a cafe racer or a bobber.


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@xlr8it
How was the Valkyrie riding feeling?
And in terms of home maintenance was it easy to fix?
They come really cheap these days and I am thinking of slashing one to a cafe racer or a bobber.


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Hi Charlie,
I had the Valkyrie for 13 years and never had any issues with it, the only thing that is a little tricky in home maintenance is it has 6 carburettors that need to be tuned and synchronised once every few years, not hard with the right tools.
They have a very smooth and reliable flat 6 cylinder motor.
The only thing I found it was a little bit bus like, compared to the Harley, hard to explain but that could be just my opinion.
I have clocked 20000 miles on it in 13 years, compared to 30000 miles on a harley in 4 years, so I do enjoy riding the Harley a lot more.

Regards
Leon
 

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It's impossible to cover everything and we're used to the 'didn't see you' excuse.

I actually suffered the opposite.

Bright sunny day, lights on, dayglo jacket and bright red bike.
Saw a driver thinking about pulling out so horned 'em.
They stopped creeping and glared at me.
I'd already slowed, covered brakes etc and picked a possible out route.

Then they pulled out anyway.

Unfortunately a car passed me either side, eliminating the best outs.

Result? Slow speed impact into the rear wheel arch and a slight tightening of the jeans as I mounted the tank a little.

And why did they pull out.
Had they not seen me?
Not heard me?

No!

Because I was speeding.
I had to be speeding because my lights were on!

Fortunately, the gaggle of roadworkers witness the whole thing because the looked when I hit the horn.

Not only was I not speeding, I'd slowed more after seeing them edge forward initially.

Damage? A crack in the front mudguard chiefly.
And a couple of bumps!

And they wonder why bikers suffer road rage.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Similar situation had me hospitalized and ruined my Triumph.
I was cruising at the middle lane when suddenly two street racing BMW's came from my back and tried to pass me together from left and right but due to traffic they had only my lane to eacape so they both invaded it simultaneously leaving me no option but to lock the brakes and hit one of them in the drivers side.
After a quick flight I landed on my hip and left arm.

I have attended many seminars and riding schools in the past, just to be prepared for such situations but it was a hopeless case.

Anyway after four months I was "back on track" so everything is ok
And speaking of track here are some recent pics:


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Back in biking after a 3 year break

I had been thinking about getting another bike for a while and came across this last of the pre vtec Honda VF800Fis in a local bike shop. 2002 and only 1 owner from new and 4,500 miles. Never been ridden in the rain!

I preferred twins in the past, Firestorm, ST4s and Multistrada. But always fancied one of these.

In my garage now, but not ridden it properly yet.

I want to replace the 9 year old tyres first, some new BT023s, I think.

Super excited, happy Christmas to me :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
For some reason unknown to me, they are the most undervalued here.
Why? Have no idea.
Every month local dealers expirt more than 50 bikes to England and Germany while supplies last.
You can have a great VFR at about 2.000-2.500k euros nowadays.


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What touring France looked like in the 80s.
Still got this 400fourF2 stashed away.
She's being saved for when the 800 is too heavy for me to move around.
In those days of madness my mates nicknamed the bike Nina.
That was the sound I was oft followed by.


New Brighton Egg Run 1998. My second VFR.
Had a love of red Viffas back then.
This is taken from the cover of the Liverpool Echo.
It looks like I'm leading the run. I'm not.
I'm actually way back (50+) but still near the front of a massive pack.


All the other bike pics are on an old pc.
As soon as the steam supply is restored, I'll fire it up and dig them out.
 

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Lots of great fun bikes here!

As for being seen on the bike, I have a headlight modulator on my Ninja 1000. It strobes the lights and many cars think that I am a cop or emergency vehicle. It annoys folks but at least I am seen.


The VFR is a fantastic all around sport tourer, I had the original V45 interceptor (VF750F) that I road for many miles.
Also 500 Interceptor:
 

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Charlie350 great that you got back on the horse that threw you. Not everyone can do that. I really like your bikes. They have a lot of character. I would love to ride a Moto Guzzi some day.

Awesome to see you doing track days with that Guzzi. So much fun and a great way to see what your bike can really do.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
What touring France looked like in the 80s.
Still got this 400fourF2 stashed away.
She's being saved for when the 800 is too heavy for me to move around.
.
Great bike also.
Although I love mine, I can't seem to sort it out.
Three years and counting at the shop, can not seem to make it right.
I told the mechanic that this will be the last year of efforts.
If it doesn't get fixed (electrics, hiccups and a constant de-tuning of the carbs) it will be replaced with an Ural.
You guys probably don't know the brand, but I actually grew up with these bikes (copy of the BMW R51 in Russia).
They are slow, sluggish and very harsh to ride, but with some easy tricks they can be tuned and turned into some very fine retro-resto-mods that actually deliver lots of fun.
My father had one and I really know how to work on it and what to do to make it right.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Charlie350 great that you got back on the horse that threw you. Not everyone can do that. I really like your bikes. They have a lot of character. I would love to ride a Moto Guzzi some day.

Awesome to see you doing track days with that Guzzi. So much fun and a great way to see what your bike can really do.
I am still very scared and I admit that this is the reason I picked the Guzzi over some T120 or a Ducati.
Just 52hp (46 at the wheel) with ABS and anti-spin.
I try to go at as many track days as possible just to get over the fear but riding on public roads still gives me the creeps sometimes.
 

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Great bike also.
Although I love mine, I can't seem to sort it out.
Three years and counting at the shop, can not seem to make it right.
I told the mechanic that this will be the last year of efforts.
If it doesn't get fixed (electrics, hiccups and a constant de-tuning of the carbs) it will be replaced with an Ural.
You guys probably don't know the brand, but I actually grew up with these bikes (copy of the BMW R51 in Russia).
They are slow, sluggish and very harsh to ride, but with some easy tricks they can be tuned and turned into some very fine retro-resto-mods that actually deliver lots of fun.
My father had one and I really know how to work on it and what to do to make it right.
Jawa and Urals were the pocket money bikes.
With just a little investment they gave a good return on performance.
Straightforward to maintain too.
 

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Great bike also.
Although I love mine, I can't seem to sort it out.
Three years and counting at the shop, can not seem to make it right.
I told the mechanic that this will be the last year of efforts.
If it doesn't get fixed (electrics, hiccups and a constant de-tuning of the carbs) it will be replaced.
That's a shame the CB 450 is a fine machine.
The carbs on these are nice as they don't use the rubber diaphragms on the constant velocity carbs that most Hondas of that era used. Be sure and check the rubber intake that carb goes into for cracks and good seal on head. Best to take carb apart, take out all rubber o-rings and idle and air screws and vat overnight in commercial carb cleaner acid. Start with air mixture screw 1 1/2 turns out. Never use these carbs with the air filter pods you see. It will never run right. It needs some type of velocity stack or stock Honda rubber stack.

Be sure when you tune one of these that you use the minimum points clearance .012 Best to use new points as the springs can get weak and float at higher rpm and cause missing. Make sure that the advance springs are working right. Always set timing on these with an old fashioned timing light with engine running, and make sure that it advances to the two hash lines as the advance kicks in. Do this on both set of points as they are adjusted separately.

This has the very unusual torsion bar valve spring instead of springs. Clearance is very thin and must be precise. Be sure that the hash mark on the adjuster screws face up and away from the engine. I have seen many of these adjusted backwards.

Good luck! Get that bike going again!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
That's a shame the CB 450 is a fine machine.
The carbs on these are nice as they don't use the rubber diaphragms on the constant velocity carbs that most Hondas of that era used. Be sure and check the rubber intake that carb goes into for cracks and good seal on head. Best to take carb apart, take out all rubber o-rings and idle and air screws and vat overnight in commercial carb cleaner acid. Start with air mixture screw 1 1/2 turns out. Never use these carbs with the air filter pods you see. It will never run right. It needs some type of velocity stack or stock Honda rubber stack.

Be sure when you tune one of these that you use the minimum points clearance .012 Best to use new points as the springs can get weak and float at higher rpm and cause missing. Make sure that the advance springs are working right. Always set timing on these with an old fashioned timing light with engine running, and make sure that it advances to the two hash lines as the advance kicks in. Do this on both set of points as they are adjusted separately.

This has the very unusual torsion bar valve spring instead of springs. Clearance is very thin and must be precise. Be sure that the hash mark on the adjuster screws face up and away from the engine. I have seen many of these adjusted backwards.

Good luck! Get that bike going again!
Concentrated wisdom this is.
Thank you Sir.
I will get this bike back home from the shop and try to fix it myself, as it seems that the mechanic has no idea about all these.
Once again thank you, I was almost ready to give up

(p.s. if I manage to sort the Honda, it will be one of my very happy days as lots of time and money have been spent on it)
 
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