Mercedes SLK World banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I fell in love with the SLK in 1998 out in Long Beach, CA where the owner of a hotel had purchased one and he loved it and was happy to show it to me. Being a blues bassist I knew it would be years before I could afford one of the beasties, but this year I took the leap and purchased one that had been used doing 200 miles a day commuting and had accumulated 123,000 miles. I had Mercedes pull up their records on the car and it had a new transmission at about 46,000 miles and a rebuilt convertible top. My question(s) are what preventative maintenance does the readership suggest in what order? I'm not getting any lights, yet, and I'd like to prevent any from showing up. So, whad'ya think, folks? Bless y'all!
 

·
Administrator 2009 SLK 55 AMG/Founding Member 2006
Joined
·
98,233 Posts
moving to the r170 general discussion section
you originally posted this in the forum help center which is when you have a question about the forum and its operations
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
317 Posts
Tough car to haul your gear! I'm a Blues Bassist too....I actually use it for small gigs. My GK MB112 amp fits perfect in the trunk and my Jazz bass in the front seat! I have a Markbass 2x12 cabinet that just might fit in the trunk, but have not tried yet!

My SLK is a '99 and I just turned 90k on the miles. It was pretty well maintained by the previous owners, but I just had done a whole bunch of stuff done to it at the dealer, all age related.

Had new seals put in the top because of some leaks (Florida rain!), replaced some worn motor mounts, replaced a cracked power steering hose, some belts and a oil change! Around $3k worth of work. But I love the car, so it was worth it to me. Also put on some new tires which made a world of difference! The tires on it when I bought the car in February were really cheap and noisy.

If you are concerned about your can do to the mileage, have it checked over by a good mechanic that knows MB stuff. Best to catch issues early.


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

·
Super Moderator 2010 SLK300 2LOOK
Joined
·
14,950 Posts
I didn't welcome you in your first post so I'll do it now! Hi and welcome from central Florida!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
Get regular maintenance done by M-B savvy Indy and make sure they give the car a general inspection when they do it. They will catch many things before they become a breakdown problem. If has not been done, probably time for transmission fluid change. Many things such as most sensors and modules, etc. can not be "maintained", they work, then they fail. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
For that high mileage car, I think you should do an engine flush using this product or any similar product....

http://www.liqui-moly.de/liquimoly/produktdb.nsf/id/en_5200.html?Opendocument&land=GB

There are a lot of people who doesn't change their engine oils as recommended. This causes sludge formation in the engine and may damage it in the long run. Being that this is a second hand car and having no idea if the previous owner changed the oil regularly. i think it's best if you do this on your next oil change. I usually do the engine flush if the car is already 10 years old or more. But there are some people I know that do this everytime they have an oil change.
 

·
Minion
Joined
·
5,602 Posts
Check the drains, get a coolant flush, check the VIN with the local MB dealership to try to get a sense of what [if any] service has been done. Check your service manual for your mileage and see what was most recently done, vs what is coming up mileage wise. Was a 100k schedule b ever performed? Check the spark plugs, get a bottle of Techron fuel additive to help clean out the gunk, read the grease thread to condition your rubber seals and get some white silicone grease for your locks [don't confuse the 2, they are not the same].

welcome!
 

·
Registered 2006 SLK350 sold/now 2018 SL400
Joined
·
301 Posts
Get a good mechanic to check over all the steering and suspension. The steering damper is likely to need replacing, but it is an easy job and cheap. Wear on the ends of the steering drag link is likely - expensive as it is a one piece unit.

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Hi Patfield47,

I would strongly recommend changing the magnet on the end of the camshaft. Inside is a tiny O ring which fails and then let's oil into the loom. The cost of the magnet is €38 don't know what that is in dollars. Mine went and I have just had a whole new front engine loom replaced as it was full of oil. It can in the worst case get all the way back to the ECU and turn your car into a very heavy paper weight. Mine also took out my O2 sensor and the ECU was splattered with oil but cleaned up OK.

You can check it by removing the plastic cover at the front of the top of the engine, the magnet is a circular brass coloured bit with a cable plugged into it. Unplugged the brown cable connector from the magnet and check for oil.

There are some good pictures here on the C Class forum, hope it's alright to post a link here?

http://mbworld.org/forums/c-class-w203/237667-m111-leaky-cam-sensor-replacement.html

I would also suggest a transmission service every 50k and changing the diff oil too at that interval.

I hope you enjoy the car and you get another 100k out of it. All the best Jack
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thank you all for your suggestions! My thoughts were 1) Transmission service with filter 2) Timing chain 3) I like the idea of a new o-ring for the camshaft 4) Front end inspection and repair and finally 5) Whatever has not been done in the service book at this mileage. The 0W-40 oil is so clean I believe that I am OK there. Who knows about rebuilding the clutch on the supercharger? I'm somewhat knowledgeable regarding the OM917 turbocharger, but no nothing about superchargers. Once again thank you for your suggestions!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,314 Posts
Your transmission has a drain plug on the torque converter. When you service the transmission, make sure you drain the torque converter too. That way you can get 95% of the old fluid out as opposed to less than half by just dropping the pan. Your transmission likely does not have the pan magnet in it either - get one from Mercedes for about five bucks. Make sure you use the proper fluid and get the fill level correct - you need a dipstick for that.

You can't tell a whole lot about the oil condition by just looking at it. Did the car come with any service records? How do you know it has 0W40 in it?

Motor mounts will need to be done if they are original.
 

·
Per ardua ad cineris.
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
One thing that gets ignored except when the car is new to someone is the brake fluid; cheap to change, and prevents failures caused by entrained water leading to corrosion.

The other thing that is special for this engine is the low flow scavenging system; it feeds into nozzles in the inlet menifold, and these nozzles get blocked. The hoses below them then get blocked, etc, etc. About 20 USD worth of bits, but the inlet manifold has to come off (JaysonM is about to do this, so he should have a DIY soon)
If you don't do it, the low flow goes into the high flow scavenger, which doesn't work at low flows, and the oil gets onto the MAF, and leads to confusing symptoms of hesitation and erratic running. No major cost to oily MAF, just do NOT clean with silicone spray.
(See this thread for links to more stuff)

Good luck with it; you have all the pointers here, and will then have it running as sweet as a bell. (Not the Liberty Bell! ;) )
 

·
Per ardua ad cineris.
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
123K miles

Don't sweat this as high mileage.
Others here have higher mileage (211k) so you are only dealing with neglect rather than end-of-life failures.
especially with 200 miles daily commute; with teh best will in the world, it takes a lot of "enthusiasm" to beat up a car on a long-term commute like that, day in and day out. So the mileage ends up being highway, and the thing that will suffer most is the brakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
I just had to have the MAF replaced. I am just over 100K. Some seal in the 'Oil Seperator?' broke and it started pulling oil through the intercooler onto the MAF. They had to clean the intercooler out. But now it runs so pretty!!
 

·
Per ardua ad cineris.
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
I just had to have the MAF replaced. I am just over 100K. Some seal in the 'Oil Seperator?' broke and it started pulling oil through the intercooler onto the MAF. They had to clean the intercooler out. But now it runs so pretty!!
I had another car where the oil leakage through the intercooler was so high, it had to be seen to be believed. Leakage from the manifold area made the whole engine bay look a mess. Found the leak (missing one bolt of three where the plastic duct fitted onto the metal manifold) and cleaned it up.
So I changed the intercooler.
And when they were both in my hands, I could only tell the new one because the old one had not yet been cleaned on the outside. These things seam to live in a clean (filtered air) oily (crankcase scavenge) environment, and might just have a teaspoon of oil in the whole 30" x 10" matrix.

So, on the same car, I've just blown the turbo, and (once I let it all get cold) it ran again OK, and after one burst of oily smoke, the engine runs clean. I'm not going to swap the intercooler again; I reckon unless the super- or turbo-charger has let go (spreading bits everywhere) the airflow will clean it out OK.

And on my SLK, the MAF cleaned up a treat with a bit of carb cleaner, and ran sweet as a nut for pennies expenditure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
I still have the original MAF, was thinking about cleaning it out and stashing it just in case. My engine bay was pretty clean aside from the power steering fluid leak, the guys at the shop cleaned out the engine compartment though, did a great job too, looks so pretty.:D
 

·
Per ardua ad cineris.
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
I still have the original MAF, was thinking about cleaning it out and stashing it just in case. My engine bay was pretty clean aside from the power steering fluid leak, the guys at the shop cleaned out the engine compartment though, did a great job too, looks so pretty.:D
Good move.
May be that you can sell to someone on the forum who has actually got a broken one.

Nice that the oil has been tidied up; oil in the engine bay does seem to be the measure of quality for a car, even though many other things are more important, and actually a faint protective coat of oil can reduce the corrosion issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for suggestions

I would like to thank you all for your suggestions about what to check on my car. The car doesn't leak, will go as fast as specced, and changes gears well. I prefer a slightly harder shift than my car's. Is there an adjustable vacuum modulator on this transmission. My only complaint is that the car vibrates and I suspect that it needs engine mounts and transmission mount. Any thoughts on this would be appreciated. Once again, thanks for the help!
 

·
Per ardua ad cineris.
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
So, on the same car, I've just blown the turbo, and (once I let it all get cold) it ran again OK, and after one burst of oily smoke, the engine runs clean. I'm not going to swap the intercooler again; I reckon unless the super- or turbo-charger has let go (spreading bits everywhere) the airflow will clean it out OK.
Here where I get to eat my words.
I changed the turbo, and gingerly set out to test drive the car. As soon as it reached 1500 rpm, it started to suck oil out of the intercooler, and started to run away. So I jumped on the brakes, and dumped the clutch. (Nasty!!!)
Three or four cycles of that, and I could get to 2000 revs, so could get movement.
Drove to a nearby hill, and drove up there in the gear that allowed the throttle to be wide open, but the engine around 2000-2500 rpm, and it seemed like the intercooler was dumped out of the exhaust! (Apologies to the 1950's bus going up the hill behind me; I'm sure everyone thought it was him, but "it was me!" ) )
Three more runs in total, increasing the revs and throttle up the hill, and I finally had full throttle and almost full revs, with out run-away or excessive smoke.

So a delicate and risky procedure, and lots of nasty environmental effects, so I can now appreciate that there have to be better ways of cleaning out the intercooler. (Still favour a good drain plug... ;) )

Apologies for my comment earlier; my method might work, but is not appropriate for the modern servicing department.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top