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2008 SLK55 AMG
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109 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Greetings my SLK brethren!

I’ve got a flat tire on my R171, my tires look worn, so I’m thinking of getting all new tires.

I want tires with a lot of grip, good with rain and ice, anti hydroplaning if possible.

Willing to spend about $1000-1500.

Can regular tire shops do the tire replacement and wheel alignment?

Regular tire shops like Discount Tire, NTB, Firestone, Costco, and so on. Which one would be best and able to do a solid job and have the tires I need in stock?

Current Tires:

Front:


Continental Extreme Contact DWS 06 Sport Plus Technology
225/40 ZR 18

Rear:

265/35 ZR 18

Continental Control Contact Sport A/S

Tire Images including the flat tire:

Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Automotive tire

Wheel Tire Automotive tire Locking hubs Tread

The flat ^
Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Automotive tire

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Vehicle brake Tread

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Vehicle Tread

Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Automotive tire
 

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Founding Member 2006
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115,268 Posts

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**Registered From: New Mexico
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597 Posts
Discount Tire along with the Michelin , Rain but not ice. We get Ice here and no they are like any other tire on ice. Will they have them in stock, You will have to check. Got my in a few days when ordered. Might check online for them and could save you some $$$.

Might add get a 4 wheel alignment after you put 500 plus miles on the tires.
 

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*Premium Member
2006 SLK55 AMG 621418 619056
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145 Posts
That’s what’s on there right now, on the front that is.

Could I do better grip-wise? Like I’ll still get some slippage from time to time especially taking turns while accelerating.
Yep, with these from Continental ExtremeContact™ Sport 02

 

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*Premium Member
2008 SLK55 AMG
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801 Posts
There is a formula for minimum aquaplaning/hydroplaning speed. Minimum speed V (in mph) = 9 x square root of the tyre pressure.
minimum aquaplaning speed formula - Google Search
Like everything it may be different depending on your tyres (bald or new). But it's amazing when driving on the motorway here how many people haven't a clue about slowing down in heavy rain !!!
 

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*Premium Member
2008 SLK55 AMG
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801 Posts
just to be a bit clearer, quoting captdm 13th August 2006 from pistonheads -
Hi,
Just to clarify the aquaplaning formula that is very accurate.
Firstly the formula applies to aviation and the answer is expressed in Knots (nautical miles per hour) so get the answer and multiply by 1.15 to give you the answer in statute miles per hour (vehicle MPH)

There are many criteria to be addressed in using the formula. For a start, the tread of the tire is ineffectual once the depth of standing water equals the depth of tread on the tire. The tire behaves the same way as if it was bald once this happens. The tire pressure is the underpinning criteria due to it's direct effect on the tire footprint loading, that is, the smaller the footprint the higher the loading on the surface. formula (weight supported divided by tire contact surface area) So, using that formula the higher the tire pressure, the higher the aquaplaning initiation speed will be. Also, the interpretation of the formula maintains that the value expressed is the speed that aquaplaning MAY OCCUR, NOT WILL OCCUR. The second part of the formula states that once the aquaplaning is established the speed that it will cease is 7.5 times the square root of the tire pressure.

These formulae weren't just made up, they were derived by testing and noting the results. In aviation the word "demonstrated" takes a new and powerful meaning. Virtually everything in aviation has to be "demonstrated" before it is written in the aviation training syllabus and accepted as fact.

It is interesting to note that when hydroplaning or aquaplaning occurs, a steam pool is created beneath the tire, between the tire and the road. This causes the tire tread to boil and melt (rubber reversion) and ruins good tires. Also, the steam pocket is located forward of the center of gravity in the direction of travel, located directly under the center of the axle and perpendicular to the road. Because of this the wheel will rotate BACKWARDS!

Thought this might help
Regards to all
 

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2019 SLC300
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I used Conti Extreme Contacts DWS on the 170 when I had it and just put the Conti Extreme Contacts DWS 06 Plus on my 172. I like the ride and the traction for all-around driving. I do not track or push the car to the limits, like the all-season traction they provide. I would put them on all four corners.

I bought the last ones from Discount Tire, bought them online, and had the store install them. The online price was better than the in-store price.

Alignment I would use the dealer. Some tire shops can not do a four-wheel alignment.
 

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2008 SLK55 AMG
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109 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I’m kind of steering towards the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4’s from Costco, they’ve got a good deal too - it would be under a grand everything included (installation, 5 year warranty, etc.)

Now the question is do I continue with the 265/35 on the rear tires like I have now (which I’ve always had since buying the car) or should I try for 255 or 245’s? I read wider tires give better performance, or would the 245’s feel more natural with the car?
 

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For a softer ride:

Being in Texas, I would think that snow is not really an issue so rather than AS, consider summer tires as they are softer.

Sites generally agree:

Summer tires
Usually marketed as performance tires, summer tires work best in warmer weather (read: over 45-degree temperatures). Summer tires are made from a softer rubber compound and are typically fitted with large tread blocks to give maximum contact with the road in warmer weather. As a result, summer tires generally have more grip in both wet and dry conditions and provide optimal cornering and braking capabilities.

However, once temperatures drop, their soft rubber compound hardens, and traction suffers greatly. Not only that, colder temperatures may cause chipping of the tread block edge or the tread compound rubber to crack. Since these failures are generally treated by tire companies as the result of improper tire use, they're rarely covered under warranty, meaning the replacement cost will be on you.

More importantly, however, summer tires just don't grip in cold weather, whether there's snow or ice present on roads or not. Cornering performance is greatly impaired, and stopping distances can be lengthened dramatically. Simply put, summer tires aren't just unsuitable for temperatures below 45 degrees, they're genuinely unsafe.


Keep in mind though:Softer = faster wear and for what these cost, I'd want them to last.
 

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2008 SLK55 AMG
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109 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Unfortunately we’ll have below 45 degree temps all winter. We’ve had a bit of snow the last couple years and expect some this year too. But driving in near freezing temps is expected, so I don’t wanna risk putting summer tires on. The bridges do ice in the winter.

Would the performance be impacted if I put all season tires on? And if so, by how much compared to the Continental Contact ones on there right now? I don’t intend to track the car or anything just regular driving sometimes driving fast through curves and also going fast in a straight line. Which is technically all driving, isn’t it? :unsure: So yeah, whatever keeps me going fast and keeping grip, I do realize that it could be all over with one unfortunate skid, so being very mindful of that.
 

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2006 SLK55 AMG 621418 619056
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145 Posts
Unfortunately we’ll have below 45 degree temps all winter. We’ve had a bit of snow the last couple years and expect some this year too. But driving in near freezing temps is expected, so I don’t wanna risk putting summer tires on. The bridges do ice in the winter.

Would the performance be impacted if I put all season tires on? And if so, by how much compared to the Continental Contact ones on there right now? I don’t intend to track the car or anything just regular driving sometimes driving fast through curves and also going fast in a straight line. Which is technically all driving, isn’t it? :unsure: So yeah, whatever keeps me going fast and keeping grip, I do realize that it could be all over with one unfortunate skid, so being very mindful of that.
I would definitely consider the Continental tires as they are high-performance all-season tires. I've them on my MB S550 4matic and they are very good all-around tires for all seasons.
 
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2007 SLK55 AMG
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3,208 Posts
I have Barum on my Xfire, many on crossfireforum use them
I believe made by Continental.
Toyo on my Ml350
Haven't done tire on 55 as it only has 35,000 and still looking good
 

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*Premium Member
2006 SLK55 AMG 621418 619056
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145 Posts
I have Barum on my Xfire, many on crossfireforum use them
I believe made by Continental.
Toyo on my Ml350
Haven't done tire on 55 as it only has 35,000 and still looking good
I have the Continental Extreme Contact DW06 Plus on my Crossfire.
These have been excellent tires on all my MB's at a good price.
 
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