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Hi folks, as I mentioned in my "Is my 320 jacked up?" post, I got correct size (and very good quality) tires for the rear, but if anything, the gap between the top of the tire and the wheel well looks even bigger. But I got "blue dot" rear coil springs off a low mileage SLK320, and that should return it to normal. But the guy who put on the tires said it was a big job to swap them in. I was surprised because it seemed like it took no time for the junkyard to get them off the old SLK. The guy said the control arms or suspension arms or whatever that is, and the shocks, both need to be disconnected to get the spring in. Even so, it doesn't sound like 2-3 hours and $250 (labor only). I just didn't want to compress the springs myself. Thoughts? Thanks!
 

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Registered 2012 SLK 55 w/P30
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3,421 Posts
I changed the rear shocks and coil springs on my 2009 R171 facelift. Not horribly difficult.
 

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Registered 05 SLK55 & 06 Kleemann 55K S8
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It takes a specialized spring compressor if you want to do it the easy and quick way. $70 on Ebay. If you don't have that spring compressor then yes it is a bigger job. 2.5 hours sounds about right for both sides.
 

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I looked into renting a spring compressor kit when doing mine but ended up buying a Draper one off ebay. With the correct equipment it was a fairly straight forward job as already mentioned. I would not attempt it without the correct kit as you have to compress the spring quite a lot and a compressed spring is potentially dangerous.
 

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Registered 2012 SLK 55 w/P30
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Nothing potential about a compressed coil spring being dangerous. I’ve seen a compressor break once, was not pretty. More dangerous than a loaded gun.
 

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Not a fun job!

You need a tool similar to this one:

https://www.ebay.com/i/312586961755?chn=ps&norover=1&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-117182-37290-0&mkcid=2&itemid=312586961755&targetid=541454200052&device=c&mktype=pla&googleloc=9015849&poi=&campaignid=1881946470&mkgroupid=74094014870&rlsatarget=pla-541454200052&abcId=1139336&merchantid=118872766&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI7fzNtY_L4wIVCdbACh19GgLjEAQYAyABEgL2SvD_BwE

With it, the job is fairly straight forward and can be done using jack stands. Another method involves using a lift and a tall hydraulic jack:


I would imagine an independent job would take around three hours. In my neck of the woods, the typical labor charge is $100/hour, pretty cheap!
 

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And you might be able to do it with a floor jack.

The problem with any of these methods that don't first tension the spring, is the lower wishbone or spring link (Mercedes speak) can get twisted making removal of the bolt that attaches it (to whatever) difficult.

>:D
 
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