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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks, currently looking for a R171 55 again but this time a facelift! Now I know the 6 pot brakes were good on my '05 55 but what are the 'non performance pack' brakes like on the facelift? Is it easy to upgrade if I want to? I know they are more expensive to replace discs but I like stopping power as much as going power! Does anyone without the performance pack brakes feel they could do with being a bit better or have they been perfectly adequate?

Thanks :smile:
 

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Administrator 2009 SLK 55 AMG/Founding Member 2006
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I am completely satisfied with my 4 pot (piston) facelift brakes :D
They stop my Supercharged 55 just fine!
 

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Premium Member 2005 SLK55 AMG
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Mabel isn't supercharged but she pulls up just fine on 4 pot brakes as well. :smile:
I can verify that Mabel stops just fine on her 4-pot brakes... Davie's always managed to pull her up before touching my rear bumper so far! :tu: :D
 

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Super Moderator UK SLK 55 AMG 2007
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27,370 Posts
I've got 6 pots on the 55, BB has 4 pots on the 350.
She keeps asking me how much to get the 6 pots.


I think a lot depends on driving style. If you're reading the road and not relying on brakes to
get you out of trouble ie going in too hot all the time.


You can upgrade the 4 pots and six pots by switching to racing brake fluid.
However, it likes water even more than the standard so changes come more frequent.
 

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Administrator 2009 SLK 55 AMG/Founding Member 2006
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Because someone asked me in a pm:
4 Pot calipers means that the brake calipers are holding 4 pistons. Different types of calipers (the thing that holds the pistons themselves) will hold different amounts and types of pistons. The calipers themselves are made from a variety of materials, steel and aluminum being the most popular - steel for durability, and aluminum for weight. The more pistons the better the braking power and pedal feel. The piston itself is normally made of stainless steel, which is durable. The pistons in the brake calipers are actuated by hydraulic fluid called brake fluid. (typically glycol-ether, but there are other brake fluids such as silicone based fluids out there. Brake fluid is classified by dot 1, dot 2, and so on. ) Glycol-ether absorbs the water around it which affects the boiling temperature. For example, glycol-ether 5.1 boils at 518 degrees F when dry, and only 374 degrees F when wet. Brake fluid must also stay liquid at cold temperatures or the brakes will literally freeze up. Many added safety features such as ABS require this to operate right. You have to change your brake fluid fairly often, depending on usage and type of Dot fluid you are using.
 
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