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Registered 2006 SLK200
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys just bought this $5 jobby, have not tried it out. Do you think this will bleed the brake fluid with only myself pumping the brakes without getting air sucked back in? It has a spring ball valve on the one side and nipple attachment on the other.
 

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Yes, you can let it gravity bleed, that way you do not have to use the brake pedal and worry about the possibility of sucking air back into the lines when depressed. When I bled mine, I just connected the clear hose directly onto the brake line nipples, just make sure it's nice and snug because that's an easy way to introduce air.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, you can let it gravity bleed, that way you do not have to use the brake pedal and worry about the possibility of sucking air back into the lines when depressed. When I bled mine, I just connected the clear hose directly onto the brake line nipples, just make sure it's nice and snug because that's an easy way to introduce air.

Would it be wise to put grease around the nipple to avoid air from going back in? How long did it take to bleed one wheel? Also don't you have to force the fluid out to get all the air out? Bubbles that may have formed from the deteriorating fluid.
 

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Grease around the nipple is a good idea. The gravity bleeding takes longer, it's just another option is all. Around 10-15min per wheel. Another trick is to fill the plastic container with a little brake fluid, that way the hoses stay submerged in fluid at the ends.

I've bled my brakes using the pedal too. Just make sure to top off the fluid reservoir in the engine bay, it was very easy for me to forget about it.
 

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Premium Member 2006 SLK 280-sold
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If you plan on doing this often then a pressure bleeder would be a good investment. It makes it a true one man job and you don't have to use the pedal. I bought this one. Motive Products European Brake Bleeder 0100

Best Wishes,
 
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If you plan on doing this often then a pressure bleeder would be a good investment. It makes it a true one man job and you don't have to use the pedal. I bought this one. Motive Products European Brake Bleeder 0100

Best Wishes,
Agree 100%. Pressure bleeding works nicely and brake fluid is an every other year recommended job. I'm also not sure that the gravity bleeding will get the old fluid out of the ABS unit. I thought I read somewhere that pressure is needed to clean that out.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
If you plan on doing this often then a pressure bleeder would be a good investment. It makes it a true one man job and you don't have to use the pedal. I bought this one. Motive Products European Brake Bleeder 0100

Best Wishes,
Yes I saw a video on this product and it looks quit easy to operate, however it is 10 times the price of the valve I bought, I am also a bit worried that one may pump the pressure to much and get air in the system due to not being able to stop the pressure to refill the brake fluid tank in time.
 

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Registered 2006 SLK200
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Discussion Starter #9
Agree 100%. Pressure bleeding works nicely and brake fluid is an every other year recommended job. I'm also not sure that the gravity bleeding will get the old fluid out of the ABS unit. I thought I read somewhere that pressure is needed to clean that out.

I thought I read somewhere it is not that important to bleed the ABS , it is at the Callipers where the heat is where air bubbles can form and need to be extracted. If you get air in the system then you would have to bleed the ABS also.
 

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Basically the pressure bleeder solves rather than accentuates the problems you refer to, and ABS IMHO increases the value of bleeding - more little tubes and valves to corrode due to water contamination.

I agree that it's expensive, you may want to check with your buddies and see if they have one, but make sure that you clean it out and use only the specified Brake Fluid.

Best Wishes
 
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I thought I read somewhere it is not that important to bleed the ABS , it is at the Callipers where the heat is where air bubbles can form and need to be extracted. If you get air in the system then you would have to bleed the ABS also.
Brake fluid is going to absorb some moisture. That's the reason for replacing it every two years. Personally I would want to do everything I could to remove any moisture from brake fluid in an expensive and critical part like the ABS unit, booster, etc. If you take it to a mechanic to do the brake fluid, it will likely cost you at least $100. That's what the pressure bleeder might cost unless you make your own for ten or twenty bucks. There are some good DIY's for making your own. I opted to buy mine for around $100 and with four cars, it has paid for itself many, many times over and cost me under ten bucks for fluid each time I do it.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
Brake fluid is going to absorb some moisture. That's the reason for replacing it every two years. Personally I would want to do everything I could to remove any moisture from brake fluid in an expensive and critical part like the ABS unit, booster, etc. If you take it to a mechanic to do the brake fluid, it will likely cost you at least $100. That's what the pressure bleeder might cost unless you make your own for ten or twenty bucks. There are some good DIY's for making your own. I opted to buy mine for around $100 and with four cars, it has paid for itself many, many times over and cost me under ten bucks for fluid each time I do it.

How does the pressure bleeder bleed the ABS? If the presser bleeder forces the brake fluid through the ABS from the brake fluid reservoir to the calliper nipples why can't pumping the brakes with a one way value at the nipples do the same job. Besides the bubbles form at the very hot calliper not at the cool ABS. By removing the brake fluid in the reservoir and then keeping the reservoir topped up whilst pumping the brakes clears out all the damaged brake fluid at the calliper through the nipples. When you place the pressure bleeder on the reservoir the force pushers the fluid through the path of less resistance so the fluid does not get forced though the ABS unless you open the nipple there. So pumping the brakes does the same job as the pressure bleeder.
 

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I believe the only way to bleed an ABS unit (if there is air in it) is by using the Multiplexer STAR program, or maybe the Autel MaxiDAS can perform the function as well. I think it is very difficult to remove air pockets from an ABS unit using the brake pedal. Perhaps a pressure bleeder could bleed the ABS unit because the pressure bleeder provides a constant pressure of flow, whereas the brake pedal pushes out then sucks back in when depressed, thus, air bubbles seems to stagnate rather than flow outward.


A pressure bleeder makes it easier for a one-man job. I made my own using parts from Home Depot, and buying an extra brake fluid reservoir cap. I believe you have to make sure you don't over-pressurize though as doing so can destroy the seals in the master cylinder. Pressure bleeders are advantageous for mechanic shops, but not necessary for someone who is doing their own car.


Using the brake pedal works fine as long as you don't get air in your lines. If you've never bled your own brakes then I doubt you have air in the lines. All you need is a piece of wood the lodge the pedal downward when tightening the caliper nipple.
 

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Registered 2006 SLK200
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Discussion Starter #14
I believe the only way to bleed an ABS unit (if there is air in it) is by using the Multiplexer STAR program, or maybe the Autel MaxiDAS can perform the function as well. I think it is very difficult to remove air pockets from an ABS unit using the brake pedal. Perhaps a pressure bleeder could bleed the ABS unit because the pressure bleeder provides a constant pressure of flow, whereas the brake pedal pushes out then sucks back in when depressed, thus, air bubbles seems to stagnate rather than flow outward.


A pressure bleeder makes it easier for a one-man job. I made my own using parts from Home Depot, and buying an extra brake fluid reservoir cap. I believe you have to make sure you don't over-pressurize though as doing so can destroy the seals in the master cylinder. Pressure bleeders are advantageous for mechanic shops, but not necessary for someone who is doing their own car.


Using the brake pedal works fine as long as you don't get air in your lines. If you've never bled your own brakes then I doubt you have air in the lines. All you need is a piece of wood the lodge the pedal downward when tightening the caliper nipple.

Would be great to see an animated video on haw the brake system works, see how the brake fluid travels through the whole system when the brakes are applied and when the ABS come in operation.
 

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Registered 2006 SLK200
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Give your brakes a cleaning job.

Hey guys, is there any reason why I can't use this vacuum pump, I just bought to suck out the oil, to suck out the brake fluid, after all the nipples on the calipers are not called that for nothing. If it was only meant to push out the brake fluid it would have been called "something else. :grin:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Just to up date, can't use the vacuum pump because air get sucked in between the nipple and the screw shaft, so I just let it bleed by gravity.
 
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