Mercedes SLK World banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Administrator - Founding Member
Joined
·
92,888 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Wow, what a list. I remember them

By Adam Hayes

6. Howard Johnson's
In the mid-1920s, entrepreneur Howard Deering Johnson borrowed $2,000 to open a small pharmacy and general store in Massachusetts. Soon after, he installed a soda fountain and quickly saw his profits rise. He expanded opening a string of soda shops and concession stands that eventually became Howard Johnson's Restaurants (affectionately known as HoJo's). By 1961 there were 605 HoJo's locations, as well as 88 additional locations in the related Howard Johnson's Motor Lodges. By the mid-1970s, customers began favoring quicker fast food via counter services and without the need for HoJo's formal dining rooms and wait staff. Today, there are only two Howard Johnson's restaurant locations left: in Bangor, ME and in Lake Placid, NY. The motel chain still lives on.

5. Chi-Chi's
Chi-Chi's casual family-style Mexican dining chain of restaurants was founded in Minnesota in 1975, and was taken over by former KFC executive Shelly Frank who moved the headquarters to Louisville, KY. Under Frank's stewardship, the company had grown to over 210 locations by 1995. By the late 1990s the company began its decline as its success had spawned numerous competitors including counter-service Mexican offerings such as Taco Bell and Chipotle (CMG), which took away Chi-Chi's market share. Attempts to save the business by expanding into large markets such as New York City and Boston failed, and by 2003 the company filed for bankruptcy. To make matters worse, a hepatitis A outbreak in Pennsylvania was linked to a local Chi-Chi's location and the company never emerged from bankruptcy. The company did sell the brand name to Hormel Foods (HRL) to market its grocery-sold salsa and nachos, and a handful Chi-Chi's brand locations still persist in Europe and the Middle East after being sold to a Swiss investor.

4. Bennigan's
This Irish-American themed casual dining chain was the origin of "flare" on the wait staff and chotchkas fastened to the walls and ceiling to amuse and interest patrons. Founded in 1976 in Georgia, and later owned by Pillsbury Corporation (which also owned Burger King at the time), Bennigan's grew to over 250 locations throughout the nation. But it's recipe for success was soon copied as upstarts such as TGI Friday's, Applebee's and Chili's (EAT) came on the scene, complete with walls adorned with novelties and staff adorned with flare. Unable to maintain its position, the company filed for bankruptcy in 2008 and shuttered over 200 locations. The company did emerge from bankruptcy under new ownership, but now only features approximately 30 stores.

3. Steak & Ale
Steak & Ale (S&A) once was part of Pillsbury's portfolio of fast-food restaurants alongside Bennigan's and Burger King. Before that, it was created in Dallas, TX in 1966 by Norman Brinker, who also founded successful restaurant chains Chili's and Jack In The Box (JACK). S&A was the first to introduce a self-service salad bar and grew to over 100 locations by the 1980s. In the 1990s and early 2000s the brand saw decreasing sales and by 2008 only 50 stores remained. Unfortunately, S&A was operated by the same company as Bennigan's when it went bankrupt in 2008, and while Bennigan's emerged from bankruptcy, Steak & Ale closed all of its locations.

2. Kenny Roger's Roasters
Country singer Kenny Roger's founded his namesake chain of rotisserie chicken and soul food restaurants in 1991, and eventually opened over 425 locations worldwide. The company grew too fast in an already crowded space with competitors like Boston Market and Chick-Fil-A opening stores at a more reasonable pace. Although there was initial success, and the quality of the food was generally praised, the company filed for bankruptcy protection only eight years after opening in 1998 and was eventually sold to Nathan's Famous Hot Dogs (NATH), who quietly shut down the remaining locations or converted them into Nathan's locations in the U.S. In fact, only one U.S. location remains today in Ontario, California. The good news is that the concept has caught on in Asia, with over 150 locations throughout the region.

1. Sambo's
Sambo's was founded in 1957 and expanded across the country serving burgers as well as pancakes. By the 1980s at its peak it had a whopping 1,118 locations nationwide. While the name of the brand was simply a contraction of the names of the two founders (Sam Battistone and Newell “Bo” Bohnet), it was an unfortunate one, and came under increasing pressure in the late 1980s from civil rights activists claiming the name was racially insensitive to black people as an inadvertent reference to the 19th-century book "Little Black Sambo." In 1983, more than 600 locations were renamed Seasons Friendly Eating, but the new brand image didn't catch on. Some locations were sold to Denny's (DENN) and converted in to their stores. Today, only one Sambo's exists in Santa Barbara, California.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Still missin' a pint at Bennigan's with their country ham and biscuits! That memory goes back to Tampa in the '70s and we saw the one in St. Petersburg closed in 2008.
We have a great place over here on the west side of the bay called O'Keefes. Lovely food and entertainment and they even cater to my special dietary needs. Love 'em for that! Darn gluten issue ruined my love affair with Guinness...still lookin' for something else that could even compare to keep me freckles brown! LOL!
@ Jeff- you'd likely be entertained at the Tilted Kilt an Irish pub, also in Clearwater. One of the local favorites there is the Irish Nachos! Oh and not to mention the lovely ladies who work there and grace their yearly calendar!
McSLK!
 

·
Administrator - Founding Member
Joined
·
92,888 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I been to 7 irishmen in vegas, same as tilted kilt
MaryKay is in this year's calendar
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top