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Minion
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Discussion Starter #1
I know i'm not supposed to use any detergent when washing the microfiber towels I get it. But what about drying? As long as I don't have any kind of dryer sheet or softening bar in there, can't I just throw them in the dryer? I read somewhere here, {I think eddy suggested it} that they have to be hung out to dry??? I don't know if I have room for 40 of them in the yard or a long enough clothes line much less that many pins :biglaugh:

Chime in please, ty :)
 

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On drying, my experience is if you're really fanatical, hang them up. Even me with my rather ___-ways (you fill in the blank), I 100% of the time dry my microfiber in the dryer. I have some towels that I use weekly and owned for years that still in great shape. The trick for me when drying is NEVER use the hottest setting -- I keep mine to medium. You already know about no dryer sheets, and just as with washing, don't mix other things with the microfiber when you dry or they'll pick up lint.
 

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moving to, oh I don't know, caring for your slk section?
 

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Usually I have a batch of maybe 4 microfiber cloths to wash and one microfiber wash mitt.
1 cloth (waffle-weave for drying), 1 cloth for the door jambs, around rubber seals in the hood/bonnet and trunk/boot, 1 for the Z6 gloss enhancer (quick detailer) and 1 "dirty" cloth for the engine compartment. Line-dry inside the garage area isn't an issue after washing the microfiber cloth.

My guess is that if you have a substantial number of the microfiber cloths to dry, then placing them in a separate load in the clothes dryer should be OK. Just remember to clear the lint catcher screen first before drying, and use gentle heat (for delicate fabric or knits), and then experiment with the drying time options (I probably will use the Energy efficient option, and adjust the drying time after some experience).

Just think of microfiber cloths as plastic type fabric and high heat is NOT their friend. They are also NOT flame resistant, unlike most cotton or wool fabrics.
 

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This maybe a dumb question ??? BUT, how do you CLEAN them if you don't use detergent ?? I wash all my cleaning rags with bleach and detergent in very hot water and send through a 2nd rinse cycle. And I really prefer old bath towels for drying. I don't think the microfiber towels even pick up the water ?? Am I doing something wrong ???
 

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This maybe a dumb question ??? BUT, how do you CLEAN them if you don't use detergent ?? I wash all my cleaning rags with bleach and detergent in very hot water and send through a 2nd rinse cycle. And I really prefer old bath towels for drying. I don't think the microfiber towels even pick up the water ?? Am I doing something wrong ???
You may use the detergents that are specified for "he" (high efficiency) modern washers as long as they don't have fabric softeners or bleach in them.

One can also use the surfactants (detergent) specified for microfiber (commonly sold by auto detailing suppliers, like Detailers Domain), IIRC, 30 ml (2 tablespoons or 1 capful) is enough to wash a small load. I am still on the original gallon that i bought several years ago and use this exclusively for washing the microfiber cloth. I've also used the surfactant to treat one of my mate's clothing that was soiled by cooking oil/grease and it did a good job of reducing the oil stain when the more conventional laundry detergent failed.

Microfiber cloth, dependent upon the design and manufacture, pick up 3-4 times their weight in water. The ones made for automotive use tend to be of better quality, but one has to look into its fiber composition (polyamide content) to determine efficiency. Most auto detailing sites have a little/brief primer/explanation on the basics of microfiber cloth.
 

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I agree with Eddy's suggestions. I also wash my microfiber on Hot, with an additional rinse, and use HE detergent, and in my case, every-other wash add a bit of the microfiber-specific detergent for good measure. That combination has worked well for me.

FWIW, on towel selection, a couple of addiitonal points I've found:
  • I also used bath towels many years ago for the dry. They worked well, but my "Big Blue Waffle Towels" have become my go-to version for drying, and I've more recently splurged on some of the new super-soft Uber versions to try. The latter I'm only warming to, as even after 3 washes after receipt, they didn't swallow water as well as my Big Blue's, but now that I've used them more, they are getting better in their ability to soak up and retain water as they should. Not sure I'd flip the bucks for them again though, and would probably stick with my Big Blues -- some of which I've had for years and they work as well today as they did brand new.
  • On all towels, be that bath towels AND microfiber, since I'm a bit fanatical on my finish, I've learned to watch out for towels that have polyester threads in the bindings... Unlike "borderless towels" (the best, IMHO), or ones with silk or only cotton bindings, I noticed a long time ago that my finish -- especially black and dark colors -- seemed to pick up more micro scratches for no apparent reason with my religious 2-bucket wash method, etc. Doing a little detective work with a lighter from my fireplace, I found the bindings on one set of my supposedly "100% Egyptian Cotton" towels, as well as one set of microfiber had threads in the binding that melted --- yup, they were the culprits. Those towels were relegated to being used on only dirty (wheels, wheel wells, under-the-hood) use ever since. The other thing to watch for is towels that have tags sewn into the bindings -- the remnants after you remove the tags will also scratch -- meaning the best towels are ones with no sewn-in tags to begin with or ones that can be 100% removed. I return anything else when I buy new microfiber these days.
  • The last suggestion on new microfiber is that they are not all the same or intended for the same purpose. Adding to Eddy's comments, you want absorbent microfiber for drying, and microfiber with stiffer napp for cleaning glass for example. Read what the mfgr recommends a particular towel is used for and go with that. I only use cheaper "no specified use" towels for dirty areas and sometimes application of product (cleaners, 22PLE, etc.) or where I'm going to dispose of them after use. I also keep towels of certain colors for only certain use so I don't cross-contaminate... Because I don't trust myself remembering some times, and I am rather anal in my organizational ways, I have a little cheat sheet I keep taped above my towels in the garage in case I forget or someone else is over and goes to use my towels -- they get the right one for the right purpose. :) Go HERE if you're interested in my version.
 

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Thanks for the info. I really do like the old big bath towels that the hemmed edges are actually worn off. My husband washes the car a lot for me and he uses the microfiber towels. He likes one more than the others.
 
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