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My 17,500 mile slk 350, 2006, frt. Tires are worn and cupping on the inside edges. The out side edges show normal wear.
I have been told that this is common for mercedes and bmw as the factory aligns the frt wheeles to "tip" in at the top so that as deiven at hi speeds on the auto bohn the wheels become verticle due to "airlift" at hi speeds, thus the wheeles are verticle and both tire edges wear even at the hi speeds.

Could this be ppossible and/or true............or even reasonalbe???

THANK YOU,
DEEDUBYA MCMILLAN
[email protected]
 

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Toe out (tires pointed out) will cause inside tire wear along with too much negative camber (top tire in). I've not checked the specifications but would suspect the car should have a bit of toe in (stability) along with a bit of negative camber (grip). Race / track car... toe out for response & turn in, more negative camber for better grip.
 

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Just for information, are you stating the tires have 17,500 miles, or the SLK has 17,500 miles?
Anyway, get the car to an alignment shop(either an MB dealer or an alignment shop) and have the front end checked-out, for wear and alignment specs.
 

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I have been told that this is common for mercedes and bmw as the factory aligns the frt wheeles to "tip" in at the top so that as deiven at hi speeds on the auto bohn the wheels become verticle due to "airlift" at hi speeds, thus the wheeles are verticle and both tire edges wear even at the hi speeds.

Could this be ppossible and/or true............or even reasonalbe???

THANK YOU,
DEEDUBYA MCMILLAN
[email protected]
That I've never heard.... If anything you are looking for down force at speed which would compress the suspension and give (in most cases) more negative camber. Red Bull F1 ran into a bit of trouble last season running too much negative camber with the purpose being that less of the tire is in contact with the road, giving less resistance / drag from the tire - and they run a lot of downforce!

Unless an extreme I'd say negative camber would not cause a tire wear issue, not enough toe in would be more common. Other issues would be suspension components such as bushings being worn.

Negative camber is there to evenly load the tire from side to side during cornering, too little would wear the outside, too much (and it would have to be extreme) would wear the inner edge. On older MB & BMW's with semi-trailing arms the rear tires would quite often show inner wear, due to the negative camber produced during acceleration as the rear end squatted down.

Simple for a good tire store to give you a printout of the alignment results along with the recommend settings.
 
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