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Discussion Starter #1
I am going to kill my wifes cat.
I mean it.
The cat is going to be dead, dead, dead.
Just came from my garage.
The bloody animal was sleeping on the hood.
I entered the garage, she woke up she got scared and tried to run.
As a result my hood now has many MANY MANY skidmarks from her nails.
Is this "fixable" by someone who has no idea about detailing, or should I take the car to a pro?
Thanks for any advice.
 

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Looks superficial and should be easily removed through polishing. You might still want a professional (detailer) to look at it, but I highly doubt it needs paint.

If you don't have the equipment but you want to have a crack at it, get some ScratchX2.0 from Meguiar's and try to buff it out using that stuff and a polishing pad+soft towel.
 

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Been there, shot cat :D

 

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If you run your fingernail over the scratch can you feel it? If so, it will need touching in with paint and lacquer but if not it will almost certainly polish out.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If you run your fingernail over the scratch can you feel it? If so, it will need touching in with paint and lacquer but if not it will almost certainly polish out.
I am afraid I can feel some of them but they do not seem to be very deep and can be seen only by a certain angle.
So I guess, they could be an easy fix.

Still what puzzles me is that the cat never before had slept on any of our cars.
Wife says she is a cat with a good taste and likes the car.
Still whatever the wife says, the cat is banned from the garage from now on.
 

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I would use a random orbit polisher such as a rupes or flex polisher and the least agressive car polish first. HD fine polish, meguiars, sonax, chemical guys, etc.. This should remove most of the finer scratches. Use a medium grade polish for the remaining scratches. For the deeper scratches, should you desire to continue, use a more aggressive car polish and pad. Afterwards, smooth the polished surface by going back to the finest or least agressive car polish. Then, apply some glaze to hide remaining marks, if any. Apply a good sealant or carnauba wax afterwards. If you do not have the equipment or polishing compounds, then have a detailer do the work. Check you tube for videos on DIY. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Just got a quote of 450 euros for a full color correction.
I think it is no nuclear science and would be happy within the 150-200 range.
So just ordered an orbital polisher, a full Meguiars starter kit and some extra stuff.
Lets see how this goes.
Will report back on Sunday.
Youtubers make this look easy.
(famous last words)
:grin:
 

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Clear Coat Polish

Is this "fixable" by someone who has no idea about detailing, or should I take the car to a pro?

I'd suggest starting with Meguiras M105 cutting compound to remove the scratches from the clear coat. It doesn't appear from your photo that the paint is scratched, just the clear coat. You could rub this out by hand and then follow up with Meguiars M205. Lastly, apply your favorite wax :smile:

See: https://www.amazon.com/Meguiars-Mirror-Glaze-Ultra-Cut-Compound/dp/B003LMGDHI/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1475770258&sr=8-2&keywords=mcguires+polishing+compound

See" https://www.amazon.com/Meguiars-Mirror-Glaze-Finishing-Polish/dp/B003LMJP4Q/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1475770755&sr=8-2-fkmr0&keywords=meguiars+m+205

I also found this info very helpful and I hope you will too. All this can be done by hand, you don't need to purchase an expensive polisher for an area this small.

What is the difference between polish and wax?
Answer: Good question!
There are actually three levels of products to consider. The first is a COMPOUND,,, This is a very abrasive product used to remove heavy oxidation, heavy scratches, paint overspray and the like. This should rarely be necessary. The second is a POLISH which is used for removing light oxidation and light scratches which should only be necessary on occasion, and the third is WAX which is the finish product for everyday use.
If you use a compound, it should be followed with a polish and then a wax. If you use a polish it should be followed with a wax, and of course the wax stands alone as the finish product.
I hope this clarifies things a little.
thank you
 

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Glad you are going the DIY route. When starting out, work on a 2 x 2 ft. square with overlapping motions, going left to right, then up and down. Start off with the 3 pass method, meaning 3 passes left to right and 3 passes up and down. Resist the urge to cover a much broader area. check your results. If satisfactory, move on to the next 2 x 2 ft square, until all areas with scratches are done. Use the least aggressive polish first, then move on to the more aggressive polishes and buffing pads as needed. Use medium pressure for this work. Let the machine and polish do the work for you. For waxes and glazes, use the lightest pressure and higher speeds. B4 starting out, dab the polish onto the polishing pad, then dab the pad onto the car's body in various spots to prevent polish spin off and scatter. Start slow, then increase polishing speeds as required. All of this will become second nature as you gain experience. Do not get discouraged if you are unable to remove ALL of the scratches.

I have been detailing my cars for approx 5 years now, after noticing that car washes and even their detailers were actually doing much damage to my cars paint. I have never looked back. Throughout this time, I have managed to amass, much to my wife's chagrin, lots of equipment and various polishes, pads, glazes, etc... I do have specialized polishers for various parts of the cars. I mainly use rupes and flex polishers in various sizes. 6 inch, 5 inch, 3 inch and even 1 and 2 inch specialty polishing machines such as the battery operated cordless rupes ibrid nano. This has turned into a very expensive hobby (obsession says my wife), but I get the satisfaction of DIY.

Good luck on your endeavors, trials and triumphs, on your cat instigated journey. Let us know how it all turns out. After all is said and done, after you have gained the knowledge and skills from this experience, you may actually end up thanking your cat for leading you into this path. Good Luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I am not sure that the scratches will be fixed.
I arrived home and the Meguiars kit was already there, (but will have to wait another day for the rotary polisher) so I tried by hand.
Not so much difference.
I used the harder compound with the harder pad, then the soft compound with the soft pad.... Not so much of a difference.
Will have to wait for the hardware, seems I can not do it by hand.

BUT..... I used the wax to the old but unmolested S500....
And BOY, what a result!
Next report on Sunday.....
 

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Detailing / machine polishing will only go so far... I use a dodojuice orbital polisher with 3M compound (polish). Start with fine through course and returning to fine making sure your do not 'burn the paint' by over polishing. Small amount of compound goes a long way and reduces the amount of spray when working. Then a good wax (hard or liquid) plus a sealant to finish. Oh, remember to mask off the areas that you do not want to polish (lights, trim etc).

You may want to consider claying the bonnet (hood) first to remove impurities before machine polishing :)

Your investment in a machine polisher and associated products will pay dividends down the line as your car will look great :)

And yes, YouTubers do make it look easy - and, in general it is. Take your time, small areas at a time and use a high quality buffing cloth in between to check progress. Oh, top tip... get some quick detailing (i.e. autoglym) and use it to clean down the paint...

I started detailing cars 8yrs ago and have taught myself from the basics of a two (or three) bucket wash right through to full car detailing. Extremely satisfying...
 

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Boy oh boy, some of those hood scratches seem really deep. The random orbit polisher and polish will definitely take out the fine and minor paint scratches. WARNING: This additional info and advice may cause irreparable paint burn and damage. You may NOT want to do this since this takes a bit of experience to get good results: For the deeper scratches, there are 2 main methods for paint correction: 1. Use metal sandpaper and a spray bottle. start off with 1,000 grit, then 2,000 grit, 3,000 grit (the higher the grit number, the finer the sandpaper, the lower the grit, the rougher the sandpaper)..You could actually start off with 3.000 or even 4,000 grit, spraying the surface of the car with water while sanding and wiping off the debris with a clean microfiber cloth. With the starting grit, sand side to side, then, with the following finer grit, sand up and down, constantly spraying with water and wiping off the debris. The result will be a cloudy haze on your paints clear coat surface, (be careful not to go deep and hit your cars paint layer underneath). You should be able to make that haze disappear with the machine polisher and compound. If successful, The cars surface will look like nothing ever happened to it.

Method 2: (Slightly safer but still dangerous to your cars paint - may result in paint burn) - Load your polisher pad heavily and I mean heavily, with the FINEST Polishing compound you have on hand. (Do not use a medium or harsher polish) - I know, this sounds counter intuitive) but the purpose is to minimize paint burn with the finer polish. While polishing, use strong, heavy pressure on your polisher, using the one pass method (one direction sideways, one direction up and down) and inspect your results. Repeat until you are satisfied with results. I have used both methods with success on my Black SLK 230 when I scratched the cars front side against my sons garage door post while parking. The scratches are gone and the deeper scratches are still there but barely noticeable.

Using method 2 on my Wife's ML 430, I was able to remove some really deep scratches, but managed to also burn the clear coat, size of a 2 inch circle on the hood, probably due to the extreme heavy pressure I was using. Lesson learned. So, as they say in life: You pays your money and you makes your choices. I only offer these 2 other methods, should you be brave enough to try it, but please understand the perils involved that I have listed above.

On your picture with the light on your S500, shows swirls and scratches, the kind you could get from a car wash, when the attendant wipes the car with a rag or cloth that is not totally clean. It shows a circular motion, with the scratches and swirls, following this rotating motion. The light you used is really good and bright as it shows these imperfections. I used to get these when I had my cars cleaned and detailed at a car wash. After a successful polishing regimen, the scratches and swirls will all disappear. When you shine the bright light on a well polished area, the paint should appear glossy and flat. Always use a clean, if available, virgin microfiber cloth for polishing. Fold it in four, using each new fold as the previous one gets soiled and dirty. (For info, I have about 50 pcs of microfiber cloth in various sizes, cuts and weave, even towel size, to dry my car and do final polishing). If at all possible, after washing your car, the preferable method is to blow dry your car without touching it (since touching your cars paint, even with very good microfiber cloths can still lead to fine scratches on your paint. I use a 8 hp master blaster car blower with heat to do this. Anyway, good luck and let us know how it all works out.
 

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probably wet sand it, it looks like the clear coat has been scratched....I think this guys website and tutorials are best out there...a bit long winded at times but 'very detailed'. MB is typically hard so you'll definitely need a wool pad and a micro-fibre cutting pad probably...watch how he wet sands the trunk of this Merc with 3000 grit and then polishes back to new..

 

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Discussion Starter #20
Well.......
First of all I clayed the whole area (spray-clay-spray-clay) and I used half the clay bar just for the hood.
It became dirty and couldnt find a clean spot by the end of the process.
Then I sprayed once again and used the fine sandpaper (3.000) soflty rubbing without pressure until all the area was hazy and very, very demotivating to look at.
Then cutting compound (hard) and cleaned once again with soap and water.
After that, soft compound, wiped and waxed.
I am satisfied but the deepest of the scratches is still there.
I am not confident enough to take this any further, the result is remarkably better than before.
I will take my time with this, (as I did most work by hand) untill I get familiar with the rotary machine.
I will excersize my skills on the S class that is in better shape and will have a second try at the Slk maybe next week.
FYI the cat is still alive.
 

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