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Registered 1997 SLK230
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49 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I will replace my stock brake pads with Akebono ceramic pads and plan to do a fluid change using MB Dot 4 plus brake fluid.
I have found online guides on how to replace the front and rear pads but I'm having difficulty looking for a step by step guide on how to flush and change the brake fluid.
do I change the pads first then change the fluid?
I plan to siphon off the brake fluid from the reservoir. Will I top off with new fluid then bleed each caliper until the new fluid comes out or do I need to remove all the old fluid first then top off with new fluid then bleed them to remove air in the system?
Any guide or link in the proper way to do this will really help a lot.
 

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Premium Member 2013 SLK250
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2,420 Posts
The best is to do the pad change first. I bought brake fluid that had a blue color to it. Using a brake breeder, breed each brake location until you start getting the color blue. Start with the loction longest from the master. best not to remove the fluid from the master as you might let air to get into the lines. No more than the master holds it is not worth it.
 

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Registered 1997 SLK230
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49 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
OK, so I'll change the pads first then bleed the calipers.
so I'll siphon off fluid from the reservoir as much as I can then pour in the new fluid and start bleeding until the new fluid comes out right?
 

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I will replace my stock brake pads with Akebono ceramic pads and plan to do a fluid change using MB Dot 4 plus brake fluid.
I have found online guides on how to replace the front and rear pads but I'm having difficulty looking for a step by step guide on how to flush and change the brake fluid.
do I change the pads first then change the fluid?
I plan to siphon off the brake fluid from the reservoir. Will I top off with new fluid then bleed each caliper until the new fluid comes out or do I need to remove all the old fluid first then top off with new fluid then bleed them to remove air in the system?
Any guide or link in the proper way to do this will really help a lot.
Everything as Gbarringer100 described!

Here you go:
http://www.r170slk.com/brake-pad-replacement-front/
http://www.r170slk.com/brake-fluid-change/

I followed these two guides when doing mine and also changed to Akebono ceramic ones.
Change the pads first (Make sure you get disc brake pad spreader!), then have someone help you change the brake fluid! Really easy job! I did that with my wife =) She was giving me the tools and reading the guide and also pressing the brake pedal while flushing the brakes! Also make sure you put a brick or a wooden block behind the brake pedal so it doesn't go all the way back when you bleed the system so you don't damage the pistons. When bleeding start with the farthest to the cylinder (Back passenger's side, back driver's side, front passenger's side, front driver's side). If your car is left-hand drive as in the US. Watch the level in the reservoir as you bleed the brakes! DON'T let it to empty thus letting the air in!

One thing is that I went about 12,000 miles on these Akebonos and they still squeak =((( I did everything, followed the procedure of "sitting them in" but they still squeak...... :soap: I thought of getting EBC slotted rotors sometime in the future. They do produce less dust but squeaking is killing me...
 

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Registered 1997 SLK230
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49 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
This I is what I'm exactly looking for, thanks a lot. I'll do the change and flushing and I'll post the result when I'm done.
 

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Premium Member 2013 SLK250
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2,420 Posts
Mark/Galo... did you have any squealing issues with your akebono's?

I put akebono on my 2007 SLK on the front with new rotors and no squealing.

Note I had a 2001 SLK before and replaced with OEM on rear and they squealed. The only way was able to get them to stop was to cross cut the rotors as suggested by a MB tech person. Was able to do that as there was enought meat to do it.
 

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Registered 1997 SLK230
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49 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Changed the front and rear pads today.
Did not notice any squealing but I'm a little hard of hearing :)
I did notice that the feel is softer compared to the OEM and I was thinking the brakes might either need 1. Bedding of the pads and/or 2. Bleeding to improve feedback at the pedal.
I did not change the fluid yet but plan to do it within this week.
I need some clarification, when I pump the brakes to let out the old fluid in the calipers, I need to have the engine idling right? (bec the car is power assisted??)
Or can I have the engine off?
 

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Changed the front and rear pads today.
Did not notice any squealing but I'm a little hard of hearing :)
I did notice that the feel is softer compared to the OEM and I was thinking the brakes might either need 1. Bedding of the pads and/or 2. Bleeding to improve feedback at the pedal.
I did not change the fluid yet but plan to do it within this week.
I need some clarification, when I pump the brakes to let out the old fluid in the calipers, I need to have the engine idling right? (bec the car is power assisted??)
Or can I have the engine off?
Yes, I didn't hear any squeaking at first too but then it came up. I think slotted rotors with ceramic pads is a must! I've noticed that my back squeaks the most. But report your results in a couple of weeks! =)
No no no. You don't have to start the car for that. Suck as much fluid as possible from the reservoir (I used turkey blaster :biglaugh:). Then fill it up with the new fluid. Put some wooden block behind the pedal so it doesn't go all the way back. Locate the bleeder. I connected a flexible silicone clear tube to the bleeder and put it in a disposable cup (you can use whatever container you like as long as you see the color of the fluid). Let someone sit in the car and press the brake pedal several times 4-7. It will get hard at the end. Then tell this someone to keep the pressure on the pedal (stop pumping it, simply keep it pressed). Unscrew the bleeder nut till the fluid starts coming out. Watch the fluid to come out. The person who presses the pedal will feel that the tension on the pedal will ease and it will "fall" in the back. Keep the pedal pressed). Screw the bleeder nut back in. After several attempts check the reservoir and fill it up. Don't let it become empty so the air doesn't get into the system!!!!
Then repeat the procedure till the clean fluid starts coming out! It took me about 15 times for the farthest wheel and 5 for the nearest one. :usa:
Me and my wife accomplished this mission in about an hour. :Beer:
 

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Registered 1997 SLK230
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49 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Yes, I didn't hear any squeaking at first too but then it came up. I think slotted rotors with ceramic pads is a must! I've noticed that my back squeaks the most. But report your results in a couple of weeks! =)
No no no. You don't have to start the car for that. Suck as much fluid as possible from the reservoir (I used turkey blaster :biglaugh:). Then fill it up with the new fluid. Put some wooden block behind the pedal so it doesn't go all the way back. Locate the bleeder. I connected a flexible silicone clear tube to the bleeder and put it in a disposable cup (you can use whatever container you like as long as you see the color of the fluid). Let someone sit in the car and press the brake pedal several times 4-7. It will get hard at the end. Then tell this someone to keep the pressure on the pedal (stop pumping it, simply keep it pressed). Unscrew the bleeder nut till the fluid starts coming out. Watch the fluid to come out. The person who presses the pedal will feel that the tension on the pedal will ease and it will "fall" in the back. Keep the pedal pressed). Screw the bleeder nut back in. After several attempts check the reservoir and fill it up. Don't let it become empty so the air doesn't get into the system!!!!
Then repeat the procedure till the clean fluid starts coming out! It took me about 15 times for the farthest wheel and 5 for the nearest one. :usa:
Me and my wife accomplished this mission in about an hour. :Beer:
Thanks for the step-by-step instruction.
Finished the Flushing today. Did the farthest from the master cylinder first working my way to the closest (driver front wheels).
Used up 3/4 liter of MB fluid.
The feedback at the pedal is slightly better now (maybe due to the new fluid or from the removal of air in the lines).
No squealing yet but I'll post back after a few days to keep everyone updated.
 

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Thanks for the step-by-step instruction.
Finished the Flushing today. Did the farthest from the master cylinder first working my way to the closest (driver front wheels).
Used up 3/4 liter of MB fluid.
The feedback at the pedal is slightly better now (maybe due to the new fluid or from the removal of air in the lines).
No squealing yet but I'll post back after a few days to keep everyone updated.
Good job man!
Yes, that's how much I used about 3/4. The pedal indeed got softer. Even my wife told me that! =) I didn't replace it in 4 years so it was kind of dark and the new one was soooo clean!
Well, keep us updated!
 
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