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This is a tour that my wife and I did about three years ago with our C230...not sure there's enough luggage space to try it with the SLK, though.

We started from our home near Portland, Oregon, and drove up to the Canadian border crossing at Sumas/Abbotsford, after first touring the Boeing factory in Everett. Once over the border, we proceeded to Hope, BC, and spent a couple of days in the area before heading north. We went up the Fraser River Canyon to Lillooett (Fort Berens Winery is great!) and on to Cache Creek. While in the Canyon, the gondola to the bottom is worth doing, as is the little restaurant Elvis Rocks the Canyon. Even if you're not an Elvis fan, the collection of memorabilia is awe-inspiring. From Cache Creek we proceeded up Highway 97 through Williams Lake to Quesnel, where we spent a couple of days. The old mining town of Barkerville is a day trip east of Quesnel, and well worth touring for the informative chatter of the "residents", all young actors representing dramatis personae of the town from the 1890s. Then on to Prince George, the commercial hub of central BC and gateway to the north. From there, Dawson Creek and the Alaska Highway are four hours further north.

We continued west on the Yellowhead Highway #16 out to Fort St. James (HBC trading fort) and on to Smithers. Smither's claim to fame, aside from some good skiing, is that a B36 bomber crashed near there back around 1950. We continued west to Prince Rupert, and took the BC Ferries vessel down the inside passage to Vancouver Island. The scenery is beyond beautiful, and it's worth it to get reserved seats up front in the cabin. You'll be on the boat nearly eighteen hours, and comfortable seats are welcome. The ferry docks at Port Hardy near midnight, but the various lodgings (generally basic & rustic) live by that schedule so the innkeepers will be awaiting you at that late hour. Driving down the landward side of Vancouver Island is wonderful. Campbell River has a nice First Nations (Native American, in Canadian) Museum, and Comox has a good RCAF/Canadian Forces air museum. Nanaimo is a wonderful city to stay in and plan day trips from, and we stayed a couple of days there. We took the Sidney-Port Townsend ferry back to the States, and visited family on Whidbey Island before heading home. Took us all of two weeks to do this.

Wildlife? Oh, yeah. Mountain sheep on the road to Lillooet, marmots, deer, a moose on the way to Fort St. James, black bears beyond Smithers, and bald eagles everywhere you look in Prince Rupert. Orcas seen from the inside passage ferry. Total mileage driven about 2700, and nearly 29mpg average.
 

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...and the Canadian dollar is down to $.90US so a little less expensive.
Yeah, their dollar was a little higher when we did this trip but room rates in some of these places are quite affordable. Remember that all of Canada has only 35 million people; when you get into the hinterlands towns are small and tourism is important, but this isn't resort territory (and so don't go looking for four-star hotels). That said, transport costs raise the prices of some things like food; meals can be a little on the expensive side of the ledger. Fuel is more expensive, but Premium was available everywhere and hotter grades than we have in Oregon are to be found. Our C230 Kompressor thrived on the (expensive!) tank of 98 octane that we fed her in Nanaimo.

The smaller population means that some cities punch above their weight as far as business goes. Prince George has 90,000 people, the same as our home town of Hillsboro. But it has bigger hospitals, more complex freight rail networks, major national & provincial services, and so on. It looks more like Portland itself in that regard, and that's because it's the hub of the region. There's a lovely park on a hill in town with some great views, and a pretty good railroad museum there too. Still, you won't find a Mercedes-Benz dealership any further north than Kelowna and we didn't see a lot of them on the roads up north. Prince Rupert is similar in some respects since it's the northernmost ice-free port on the west coast of the continent, and the maritime traffic drives business.

For history geeks: Prince Rupert and virtually all of BC were coveted by the US back in the mid-1800s. Remember, from your history classes, the border spat with Britain and that slogan "Fifty-four forty or fight!"? War-fevered politicians wanted us to press for a northern border at 54 degrees forty minutes north latitude. Prince Rupert is at 52 degrees. Look at a map and it will dawn on you what an immense land grab that would have been.
 

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Road trip

We are looking for a couple of good road trips for this year, I think Yellowstone will be one and this sounds like a good contender for the second, what time of year did you do it and were the bugs bad as you drove through the heart of god's country.
 

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We are looking for a couple of good road trips for this year, I think Yellowstone will be one and this sounds like a good contender for the second, what time of year did you do it and were the bugs bad as you drove through the heart of god's country.
Harry, we did this trip in July. That year was unusual, rather cool & occasionally showery. Bugs really weren't a problem at all. Mud was more of an issue; a mile-long dirt road to a Provincial park near Smithers to see petroglyphs made rather a mess of the car. It took a rare trip to a self-wash station after that (I usually wash only at home, by hand).
 
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