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Discussion Starter #1
I just got back form getting new tires for my 2008 SLK 280 with 10 spoke 17" wheels. On the passenger side I noticed that the 245/40R17 was on the front and the 225/45R17 was on the back. :frown:

To ensure they fix it right when I go back, I'm trying to decide if they mounted the tires on the wrong wheels or mounted the wheels on the wrong axle.

Is there a difference in between the front and rear wheels (I know the tires are different). If so, is there an easy way to tell the difference between them by inspection.

Thanks for any hints.
 

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Premium Member 2006 SLK 280-sold
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I have attached a picture from the EPC tool (you can get it as well if you wish, just search for this on the forum).

It shows the Part # for the front and back wheels, as well as the size designations (7.5 x 17, 8.5 x 17). The part # will be stamped on the inside of each wheel.

Best Wishes
 

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Premium Member 2008 SLK350
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You got the 10-spoke 17" wheels of the Edition10? Like these: 2007 Mercedes-Benz SLK-Class Showcar SLK ?Edition 10? - Picture 100938 | car review @ Top Speed ?
In that case the rims are 7.5J front and 8.5J back.
A 245 tyre will not fit properly on a 7.5J rim so it looks like they switched front and rear wheels. In that case I am almost certain the will rub the front suspension, the 8.5J has an offset of 30. If they do not rub they probably mounted the 7.5J rim on the front and managed to fit it with a 245 tyre. In either case these guys are absolut morons and should be ashamed to call themselve a "tyre shop". Have them fitted correctly and never ever return to these bozos.
All in the assumption ofcourse that you do have the aforementioned rims.
To be sure you will have to remove them, the width is stamped on the inside of the rim, or you just measure the width.

Correction, ET 30 makes the rim come more outward (I thought inward), so they would probably not rub. Makes the mistake more plausible.
 

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Premium Member 2012 SLK350
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They should have wheel measurement tool for when they do alignments, so if they don't see the marking have them use that.

Good luck and maybe time to look for a new shop, simple things like this should not get messed up, someone didn't care too much about what they where doing and now it's costing you and hopefully it's only time.

I would also ask the manager to have all the wheels loosen and then re-torque by hand, if the guy doing the work, didn't look at which wheel/tire went where, then I wonder if he took the time and care to torque your wheels correctly. On any of your vehicles, I would alway recommend hand torquing the lug nuts, no torque stick on an impact gun. Not sure about replacing a stud on our SLK, but on an S2000 it is about a $300 job with parts. That cost is so high because you have to pull apart the wheel bearing ($90+) to push the old stud out and the new one in.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks to all...

Yes, the car has the 10-spoke 17" Edition10 wheels. Since I couldn't find the marks on the wheels (at least as they sit mounted on the car with tires on them... not sure exactly where to look, maybe I didn't try hard enough), I was able to measure the difference in their rim width by sliding a tape measure between the spokes.

The wider rims *are* mounted on the rear, so the wheels are mounted on the correct axels and there is no interference with the suspension. The tires (on the passenger side) where mounted on the wrong wheels. Some how they managed to get the 245 onto the 7.5j (and the 225 onto the 8.5J).

Thanks to your help, I can now go back to them tomorrow and tell them exactly what they need to do to correct the situation.

An additional observation for anyone finding this thread in the future:

During the 10 mile drive back from the tire shop, I observed nothing unusual with the car's behavior in this messed up configuration. Granted, I wouldn't be the best judge of subjective problems since the roads where wet, the car is new to me and the old tires had been in very bad shape. Objectively, though the car detected nothing wrong (no ESP light, etc). This may not be surprising given the small difference in the front and rear tire diameters.
 
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