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Administrator 2009 SLK 55 AMG/Founding Member 2006
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As we gear up for an era where space travel becomes more common thanks to the efforts of companies like Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic and Elon Musk’s SpaceX, territory that was unchartered just a few decades ago could soon become commonplace. Even those of us with no interest in traveling to space have come to rely on The Final Frontier more so than ever before, thanks to an increasing number of services that rely on satellites orbiting the Earth. Cell phones and in-dash navigation systems rely on GPS satellites, Dish and DirecTV obviously use satellite feeds, and satellite communications systems offered by the likes of Inmarsat and Iridium continue to proliferate across various industries. Just how crowded is it getting up there above the Earth’s atmosphere?

The answer: Pretty crowded.

Vala Afshar, chief marketing officer of network infrastructure company Extreme Networks, recently posted a fascinating image on Twitter. Simply put, the image shows every single satellite in space that is currently orbiting Earth, in one graphic.

The picture speaks for itself:

 

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Administrator 2009 SLK 55 AMG/Founding Member 2006
Joined
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97,517 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That's why! The signal is playing pinball with all them thar satelites!
 

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Registered 2013 SLK55 AMG
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579 Posts
Nice visual of the Clarke Belt around the equator. Many of those are the geo-stationary communications satellites we use for TV.

But when it comes to clutter, it's not just satellites....there's over a million pieces of junk...nuts and bolts from Mercury and Apollo missions to full rocket bodies. NASA tracks over 500,000 pieces of space debris in orbit.

Here's another picture of the mess.

http://firstlook.pnas.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/space-debris-I.jpg
 
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