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Hi Guys,
When I purchased my 2005 SLK55 last summer and had it inspected by my MB dealer, the only issue was a small oil leak
of the right front Valve-Cover Breather Cover. A common issue on this model as attested to by this site.
So after reading up on what "others" have done with this issue & feeling the original dealer quote of $650 was almost all time based,
I took the plunge this winter while the car was in hibernation to do the job myself.

Only the right front was originally targeted but I ended-up doing both, more on that later.

Effort: Easy - Medium
Time: 2 hours actual job per side (with basic cleaning)
This does not including polishing, which I did to the covers
Tools: - Ratchet / Torx adapters (bolt removal)
- Wrench set (Spark-plug removal)
- Small flat screw-driver (cleaning, cover puller)
- In-lb torque wrench (re-installation).
- Sandpaper, greece cleaner
- Brass buffing wheel with Drill (optional)

The Air Box
- To start you need to remove the Air-Box. (see green filter installation for details on this aspect)
The Coil Packs
- I also removed the Coil-packs and spark plug leads, making space for my work area. (see picture 03)
There is a write up on changing spark plugs on this site as well.
Make sure you note where and how the packs go in place as the leads are of differing lengths. (Pic 4)
Its simply a single screw holding the packs to the valve cover.
You will have to cut the tie-wraps that hold the electrical lines to the coil packs.
To remove the electrical, its a simple release tab and pull (straight out) of the electrical tab to disconnect this
electrical line from the coil packs. (Pic 3)
- Picture 01 shows what the left Valve Cover Breather Cover looks like, without the Coil packs and leads in place.
Picture 02 shows you what one side with and the other side without coils looks like.
The Valve Cover
- There are 4 screws holding the right side breather cover(that's from the drivers perspective)
2 of these are long screws that go back to the engine block and 2 are small screws that hold the cover. (Pic 5)
Once the screws removed, you will need to pry the cover loose. It is held in place by a type of high temperature silicone,
also known as "soft gasket". Pic 6 shows the Breather cover off the Valve cover, notice the recessed seams in the
Breather Cover that need to cleaned. I used a small screw driver and some fine (320 GRIT) Sandpaper to clean the recesses.(Pic 7)
I used Gunk cleaner to remove the grime. Not being satisfied, I then tried Bicycle chain cleaner, still not perfect.
This is where my obsession comes in. :^) The covers are not very shiny and since they are out and accessible lets
see what I can do. I did see a post from Smctle (Tony) who had done a similar job and his looked much cleaner. A PM later
and I find out Tony "Bead Cleaned" them, hmmm I don't have access to that, so I first try the washing machine approach (his recommendation)
and only find that they end up more oxidized than before. So I decided to continue with the sandpaper 320 grit to start (pic 8)
and finish off with 600 Grit (pic 9). We are close but not quite there, so I now try a wired Brass drill based polishing wheel
to get the final results Pic 10. They finally look acceptable.
I now have a different problem, (Pic 11), I have a shiny nickle, attached to a drab base, what to do.
First I try to clean the Covers with Gunk then Bike chain cleaner, the results are average to say the least. I then buy an industrial
cleaner for aluminium and the results do not fair much better. No way am I going to Sandpaper the Valve Covers, since that would then
mean I will have the Air intake to contend with, that's too much sanding, especially all the nook and crannies in the Air Intake...
I then decide to try an unorthodox method. That day I was cleaning the glass stove top for the wife with "Cerabrite" and it worked and
has always worked wonders. Low and behold,it also works wonders on Oxidized Aluminium.
I did the Valve covers & I even did the Air Intake with this stuff with good results.
I'm not sure if Sand-papering the Cover Breathers did not strip any protective layer that they may have had, but in talking to Smctle
he put me onto a product he likes very much called ACF-50, an Alumina corrosion protectant. It seems to work great, it's applied like
WD-40 but dries off after a while and does not leave an oily film like WD-40 does, which would end-up being a dirt magnet.
So after a good rubbing with a 3M scotch-pad and Cerabrite and cloth applied film of ACF-50 I thought I was finished.
Until I realized my rubbing tor a small piece of liquid gasket from the left side Valve Cover Breather. Oh Crap!
I guess I will do the same for this side of the engine after all. Same procedure as before See Pic 12 &13.
Cover Reassembly:
The last step is to re-apply a fresh coat of liquid gasket to the in-seal of the covers. This process is straight forward,
a small 1/16 inch bead in the grove of the covers, not forgetting the bolt holes, with a hand-tighten bolt application of the cover
in place. After an hour to let the stuff set, tighten an extra 1/2 turn.
This permits the stuff to seep into the groves and ooze out slightly, when hand tightened then secure in place once partially set.
The DVD based star service manual says to tighten these ONLY to 8Nm, a couple of people on the site, indicated 25Nm.
I did 8 but boy, that is not very tight. I wonder why so little? Does it have to do with the expansion of the aluminium when the
engine heats up ?
Reassembly
- Coil packs
- Spark plug leads
- Electrical connection & tie-wraps
Finally Complete, you have the result on Pic 14.

Pic 15 (Pic Part-No)is the part number of this cover (this was in case I botched up and needed to order a new part (Cover Breather)
(A112 016 05 05)


Hoping this is clear. Enjoy and good-luck for anybody wanting to tackle this job.
Paul

Pictures 11-14 are in next Post (DIY: Valve Cover Breather Cover Job - extra Pictures)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
DIY: Valve Cover Breather Cover Job - Pictures

Pictures 11-14 + part No.
 

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Thank you and 'stickied'
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Merci, Jeff
 

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I'm a little confused - for my 06 slk do I need to order a part (A112 016 05 05)- or was the part needed due to a mistake? If so, what was the mistake so I can take pains not to make the same one.
 

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We'll have to wait until the poster, Papcan514, comes back and replies. He was on last.
11-06-2014, so hopefully he is subscribed to this thread and will be notified.
I read it as just in case the part gets bent, or over tightened, whatever.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
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I'm back...
The part number is only if a persons unit is damaged beyond repair or if they want to replace it for any other reason.
It was not necessary in my case, there are no surprises in the removal.
Just make sure you don't overtork the bolts on reinstallation.
After 5000km and one year, no leak has reappeared.
All is good.

Paul
 

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Well now I know why it's 8 nm - tightened too much on one and it broke off - will have to remove in the morning.
 

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Well now I know why it's 8 nm - tightened too much on one and it broke off - will have to remove in the morning.

had to re-do the passenger side after extracting the screw. Screw number 000000-004436 (replaces 000912-005010)
 
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