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Discussion Starter #1
Alright, so the thermo opened at about 95. This is the same temp that the coolant starts bubbling over. right when it opened, I squeezed the coolant lines and got air bubbles in the coolant reservoir. As I worked my way down to coolant line I realized it was all air- AKA its DEFINATELY air locked. However, I couldnt get the air out- the hose would just squeeze like an empty hose. This lasted for about 30 seconds before the coolant started boiling over and flying all over the engine bay and me. Ouch.

The fan never turned on either.

Now for the questions:
1. How do you do it on this car? Theres no bleeder valve to my knowledge so the only way would be to idle it until the thermo open, work out the air bubbles?
2. Theres no fill line on the reservoir tank- it was all the way to the top when I got the car. Is that correct?
3. The fan never turned on, but the temp never got above about 98c. What temp is the fan supposed to kick on at?
 

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I have a 230 Kompressor, but when i replaced my thermostat, I simply kept the cap off and would squeeze the upper hose periodically. In a little bit the bubbles stopped and everything seems good. I would love to know when the fan is supposed to turn on. Mine seems to go very slowly when my car hits about 90- I have to estimate cause the gauge has a spot for 80 and a line at 100. I have never had the fan go on full speed except when I hot wired it.

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm just going to replace the thermostat- It looks like I can do it without taking off the belt (I hope) even though the manual calls for belt removal.

Now the shop that was going to put in the coolant says the "universal stuff is fine for aluminum engines- you dont need anything special. Its even fine for Dexos"- Is that true?? is the universal stuff fine or do I need to get something special?

Still need to know the answer on the fan!

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have a 230 Kompressor, but when i replaced my thermostat, I simply kept the cap off and would squeeze the upper hose periodically. In a little bit the bubbles stopped and everything seems good. I would love to know when the fan is supposed to turn on. Mine seems to go very slowly when my car hits about 90- I have to estimate cause the gauge has a spot for 80 and a line at 100. I have never had the fan go on full speed except when I hot wired it.

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Did you fill the hose before you re attached it?
 

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I would not use any coolant other than the Mercedes branded stuff or Zerex G05 in mine. NAPA sells the G05 and some have reported seeing the real Mercedes blue and white jugs in some NAPA stores - not mine however.

Len
 

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Nope, didn't refill the hose. The thermostat on the 230 is at the top of the engine and super easy. I was surprised that I ended up adding over 1/2 gallon of anti-freeze. I just left the cap off and squeezed the hose while the car was running. It's been almost a week and everything looks good still.

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for your thoughts. I'm going to fill it with water. I have the wrong antifreeze in there so I'm going to bring it to a repair shop for a fluid swap.
 

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FYI, I used Peak Global Lifetime which is MB approved and is available at Walgreens even though the major auto stores do not carry it.

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Get the MB, the 5 year, or lifetime coolant and make a proper mixture of water and antifreeze (50/50? or whatever). On the water side, MB may recommend distilled? I seem to remember it doesn't matter.

Besides the radiator, there may be a drain on the block. This is nice to get all of the old mixture out. Make sure you close both drains (petcocks). While both drains are open, you can flush the sytem out with plain water.

Dump in whatever you can and start the engine. Keep adding as the level goes down in the radiator. Eventually, the thermostat will open and you can finish the fill. You'll see some air bubbles, but they'll quickly disappear.

Screw the cap on. Most modern cars the coolant temperature is close to or above 212F, so it is important that the cap is in good shape and can keep the right pressure on the system. It isn't a bad idea to replace both the thermostat and cap if the car is older (5+ years). You can also check the thermostat in some hot water to see if it opens.
 

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Tap water is fine as long as it doesn't contain too many chemicals and isn't too hard. But for two gallons of distilled at 75 cents each, why not just go that way. You aren't going to be changing it for three years anyway. May as well be safe.

Len
 
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