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After the crazy story about two security analysts taking over the control of a Jeep Cherokee surfaced two weeks ago, the world basically started to wake up and face the music. Hacking of high tech cars came into the spotlight and more and more people are worried about the potential repercussions it could have.

The guys from Kelley Blue Book, therefore, set out to see exactly what Americans thought regarding this situation. Things aren’t looking good, with car owners and shoppers in huge margins (nearly 80 percent) saying that they think this will be a frequent problem shortly.

Furthermore, the majority of the customers believe that there will never be a permanent solution available for vehicle hacking even though companies say there’s nothing to worry about.

72 percent of the people interviewed said that they are aware of the recent Jeep Cherokee incident and 41 percent claimed that this new info will be taken into account when buying a new car. Moreover, 33 percent classified vehicle hacking as a ‘serious’ problem while 35 percent classified it as a ‘moderate’ one.

When asked about how they’d prefer car makers would handle such issues, 81 percent of responders said that they think the manufacturer is responsible for securing their product from hacking whereas only 11 percent placed the blame on themselves.

At the same time, 64 percent of people would prefer to go to a dealership and let professionals handle their cars instead of applying a fix themselves. To top everything off, 52 percent of responders indicated that they would be willing to pay a monthly fee to be protected, similar to an antivirus solution.
 

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The guys who hacked the Jeep bought their own Jeep to figure it out. That's the biggest barrier I see for hackers. They might decide it's worth the investment anyway, if the payoff is being able to steal a car remotely.


It's interesting that 64 percent would trust a dealership to secure their car from a hack. One of the real-world examples of a successful car hack was because a dealer installed hardware and software on cars to make sure the customers kept up with payments. A disgruntled former employee got access to that system. I would not be surprised to read tomorrow about a hack where a dealer service employee installs hidden malicious software on cars for a year, then exploits them all at once.
 
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