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Good too know that them Germans are still coming by the plane load to Miami and have no fear.......:grin::grin:



The insects and arachnids of Florida are a dangerous bunch that can sneak up on unsuspecting victims. Considering Florida's invasive species in the Everglades, aggressive alligators, and creeping army of deadly bugs, it's fair to call the Sunshine State the Australia of America. While these critters would be enough to send most people running for the hills, Floridians are surprisingly adept at avoiding the tiny terrors.

In spite of all the weird Florida news that goes viral, the state is still one of the most popular tourist destinations in the country. If you plan to visit this borderline apocalyptic fever dream of a place, it's best to bring plenty of bug spray and get familiar with all the savage Floridians that have six or more legs. With this knowledge, you may be able to come back from that trip to Disney World in one piece.

https://www.ranker.com/list/most-dangerous-florida-bugs/eric-vega?ref=collections&l=2648084&collectionId=774
 

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We have the adder, a snake with a bite about as potent as a bee sting. I've seen two in the 40 years I've lived in Cornwall. Relatively shy and hard to see in its environment that will avoid contact with humans if at all possible. Both specimens I saw didn't move a muscle in several minutes. You will only come across one (unlikely even then) wandering on heath type ground. Stinging nettles - ouch and bee stings, only really likely if you keep them (honey bees). Oh and wasps - the horror.

The dangerous World we inhabit :)
 

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Adders do move.

Stood on one once, by accident.
Thought I had stepped in dog mess.
Looked down and do not know who moved fastest, me or the snake.

All it wanted to do was get away. Not aggressive at all.


Only one I have ever seen.

We do have Hornets.
They make a wasp sting seem like blancmange.
 

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Arizona is a paradise compare to them critters in Florida. Them Gila Monsters can get a bit nasty.



OVERVIEW
The Gila monster is one of only a few poisonous lizards in the world. The Gila (pronounced HEE-luh) is the largest lizard native to the United States. Their black bodies are covered in beadlike scales with bright spots, blotches, or bands of pink, orange, or yellow, which probably warn other animals to stay away.

Their bulky bodies, slow-moving stride, thick forked tongue, and snorting hisses reinforce the name Gila monster. They live in the dry, arid regions such as the Mojave, Sonoran, and Chihuahuan Deserts of the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico. They are named after the Arizona Gila River Basin, where they were first discovered.

Gila monsters are more likely to use their venom on a predator than on prey. They clamp their jaws down with the power of a vise grip. Then the venom in their bottom jaw flows through their grooved teeth into the victim. Although the Gila's bite is extremely painful, no human death has been reported. Gilas are sluggish creatures that feed primarily on eggs raided from bird nests and newborn mammals, such as rabbits and squirrels. They sometimes eat quail eggs whole without crushing the shells.

They spend about 95 percent of their time underground and emerge only to hunt for food or to take a sunbath. They don't need to eat very often because they can store fat in their large tails.
 

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Arizona is a paradise compare to them critters in Florida. Them Gila Monsters can get a bit nasty.



OVERVIEW
The Gila monster is one of only a few poisonous lizards in the world. The Gila (pronounced HEE-luh) is the largest lizard native to the United States. Their black bodies are covered in beadlike scales with bright spots, blotches, or bands of pink, orange, or yellow, which probably warn other animals to stay away.

Their bulky bodies, slow-moving stride, thick forked tongue, and snorting hisses reinforce the name Gila monster. They live in the dry, arid regions such as the Mojave, Sonoran, and Chihuahuan Deserts of the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico. They are named after the Arizona Gila River Basin, where they were first discovered.

Gila monsters are more likely to use their venom on a predator than on prey. They clamp their jaws down with the power of a vise grip. Then the venom in their bottom jaw flows through their grooved teeth into the victim. Although the Gila's bite is extremely painful, no human death has been reported. Gilas are sluggish creatures that feed primarily on eggs raided from bird nests and newborn mammals, such as rabbits and squirrels. They sometimes eat quail eggs whole without crushing the shells.

They spend about 95 percent of their time underground and emerge only to hunt for food or to take a sunbath. They don't need to eat very often because they can store fat in their large tails.
I do love those big cactus though and the road runners ! What a bird !:)
 

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