Mercedes SLK World banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member 1999 slk230-sold
Joined
·
14,917 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The 2016 Mercedes-Benz SLK300 luxury roadster is being recalled for a rollaway risk, NHTSA said. | May 4, 2016 | Mercedes-Benz USA, LLC

WASHINGTON — Mercedes-Benz USA is recalling 223 2016 Mercedes-Benz SLK300 luxury roadsters because of a rollaway risk, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
The vehicles are equipped with a nine-speed automatic transmission.

"The backup power supply for the ignition switch in the affected vehicles may not have been properly connected," said NHTSA in its recall summary. "As a result, if the vehicle is being driven and there is a loss of power from the main vehicle battery, the transmission cannot be shifted to "Park" nor can the electric parking brake be applied.

"In this situation, without the backup power supply, the only way to keep the vehicle from moving is to press the brake pedal. As soon as the driver attempts to exit the vehicle, the vehicle may roll, increasing the risk of injury."

A Mercedes-Benz spokeswoman did not respond immediately to a query from Edmunds asking if there are any injuries or accidents linked to the recall.

The affected SLK300 roadsters were built from June 2, 2015 to July 14, 2015.

Mercedes-Benz dealers will correct the ignition switch wiring and perform a software update. The recall is expected to begin sometime in May. Owners can contact Mercedes-Benz USA customer service at 1-800-367-6372.

Edmunds says: Owners of these vehicles should be prepared to schedule a service appointment with their dealer this month.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
866 Posts
My goodness, I guess ALL good things DO come to an END sooner or later! Yep, the end of the "Best Or Nothing" era. Anytime they make changes, whole world of new problems. This is about the stupidest design ever these manufacturers are coming out with on these electronic controlled trannys. Can't believe Mercedes has done this. Lets just have everything "fly by wire" so when the wire breaks we can just lose control of everything. Oh, its ok we can just put a battery back up system in there to save us:| I see no logic in this design whatsoever other than the typical lets make it more complicated so it will be harder to fix and we can make more money because we are no longer concerned with safety. I think I am going to stick with my 2012 now for sure, was thinking about trading for 2017 SLC AMG but its not worth all the vehicle beta testing at my expense and inconvenience not to mention my safety.
 

·
Registered 2009 SLK200
Joined
·
4,950 Posts
So after rectifiying this issue .......
If you pull up on a slope and loose battery power on both items .
Your stuck pressing your brake pedal till help arrives .

Or throw out a Mercedes supplied emergency Anchor with attaching chain ?? >:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
866 Posts
So after rectifiying this issue .......
If you pull up on a slope and loose battery power on both items .
Your stuck pressing your brake pedal till help arrives .

Or throw out a Mercedes supplied emergency Anchor with attaching chain ?? >:D
You have to have the P4 package for that option>:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,903 Posts
My goodness, I guess ALL good things DO come to an END sooner or later! Yep, the end of the "Best Or Nothing" era. Anytime they make changes, whole world of new problems. This is about the stupidest design ever these manufacturers are coming out with on these electronic controlled trannys. Can't believe Mercedes has done this. Lets just have everything "fly by wire" so when the wire breaks we can just lose control of everything. Oh, its ok we can just put a battery back up system in there to save us:| I see no logic in this design whatsoever other than the typical lets make it more complicated so it will be harder to fix and we can make more money because we are no longer concerned with safety. I think I am going to stick with my 2012 now for sure, was thinking about trading for 2017 SLC AMG but its not worth all the vehicle beta testing at my expense and inconvenience not to mention my safety.
Could you be over-reacting a little?

There is no difference between the R172 SLK 300 with 9-speed transmission (MY2016) and R172 SLC 300 (MY2017) in this area. The issue here is that the wiring loom on the ignition switch isn't connected correctly. They changed nothing. It's a recall for a defective component.

Yes, it's indicative of the fact that cars are becoming more complex and when some very clever people realised they could do away with thousands of separate wires and multiplex signals over one bundle of optical fibres, they didn't do it so it was harder to fix, they did it because it was cheaper to make and massively more flexible because to add. A feature all you had to do was branch off the BUS and connect the new controller to it.

Yes, when the 'wire' breaks it breaks everything connected to it, but now you know which wire is broken rather than having to search through miles and miles of big bundles of wires. It's actually cheaper to fix. Not more expensive. Yes, it's frustrating to be told you have to replace the whole black box concerned because there are no serviceable components inside but the black boxes are not usually expensive and replacement is just a clip and a screw usually. Once you have the part, it's literally 5 minutes to replace the part.

What has happened here is unfortunate, and I'm sure the people who program the systems will learn from this so it can't happen again.

And if you look at how the world is moving (plug-in full electric cars a la Tesla) the way current cars are built is going to have to change radically anyway.

Read this thread again 10 years time and I hope you will look back and laugh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
866 Posts
Could you be over-reacting a little?

There is no difference between the R172 SLK 300 with 9-speed transmission (MY2016) and R172 SLC 300 (MY2017) in this area. The issue here is that the wiring loom on the ignition switch isn't connected correctly. They changed nothing. It's a recall for a defective component.

Yes, it's indicative of the fact that cars are becoming more complex and when some very clever people realised they could do away with thousands of separate wires and multiplex signals over one bundle of optical fibres, they didn't do it so it was harder to fix, they did it because it was cheaper to make and massively more flexible because to add. A feature all you had to do was branch off the BUS and connect the new controller to it.

Yes, when the 'wire' breaks it breaks everything connected to it, but now you know which wire is broken rather than having to search through miles and miles of big bundles of wires. It's actually cheaper to fix. Not more expensive. Yes, it's frustrating to be told you have to replace the whole black box concerned because there are no serviceable components inside but the black boxes are not usually expensive and replacement is just a clip and a screw usually. Once you have the part, it's literally 5 minutes to replace the part.

What has happened here is unfortunate, and I'm sure the people who program the systems will learn from this so it can't happen again.

And if you look at how the world is moving (plug-in full electric cars a la Tesla) the way current cars are built is going to have to change radically anyway.

Read this thread again 10 years time and I hope you will look back and laugh.
Somebody got killed over this technology ( we talkin bout the roll away tranny prob) in the new Chrysler Jeep Grand Cherokee. Ya I overreact to stuff like this because some things are NOT meant to be fly by wire. I see your point but I would rather not have some things connected to any sort of electronic system whatsoever. Take a fly by wire throttle system for instance. Its not cheaper to fix than just replacing cable, it creates more problems and issues being connected to everything else, plus if you want it to be more responsive you have to add even more electronics like a sprint booster. What would happen if it decided to just go full open throttle on its own? You think there was any thought of safety on this? Doesn't seem to be anymore I mean just look at all the problems associated with "new technology". Ya its all cool and neato and stuff but just opens doors to worlds of new problems like ones that get peeps killed. Settle out of court, make some changes (at the beta testers tragic expense), and its all good in the manufacturing world again. "Cheaper to make" (more profit for them), "cheaper to fix" (not my experience with Mercedes), its hard for me to laugh at one of the biggest legal rackets of all time (automotive industry) that is backed by one of the biggest thugs on the planet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,903 Posts
Somebody got killed over this technology ( we talkin bout the roll away tranny prob) in the new Chrysler Jeep Grand Cherokee.
The guy died because he left it in D because it had a confusing shift mechanism. Instead of a clearly defined P R N D selection it has a +/- selector and an indicator. If he had selected P or N he'd still be alive, but he didn't. He selected D, and the car crept downhill WITH THE HANDBRAKE ON. He didn't check what gear he was in before he left the vehicle. It wasn't the car's fault. It was operator error. Yes, it's a bad design. And they've already changed it on the current model.

This recall isn't for a bad design. It's for a defective component that doesn't allow the car to operate as designed.

Robrowdy said:
Ya I overreact to stuff like this because some things are NOT meant to be fly by wire.
Are you really advocating going back to operating everything by physical connection? I'm not sure if you're aware, but the gear selection, steering, throttle and brakes on the R172 are all "fly-by-wire" and always have been. And all the bigger aircraft manufactured in the last 30 years are the very definition of "fly-by-wire". Do you not fly on anything designed after the Vietnam War? Of course you do.

Robrowdy said:
I see your point but I would rather not have some things connected to any sort of electronic system whatsoever. Take a fly by wire throttle system for instance. Its not cheaper to fix than just replacing cable, it creates more problems and issues being connected to everything else, plus if you want it to be more responsive you have to add even more electronics like a sprint booster.
If you remember, throttle cables were a proper nightmare. They had to be routed through all the other components in the engine bay and if you got the merest hint of debris inside the outer sheath they went sticky. That doesn't happen anymore. A physical cable was a practical solution to the problem of opening and closing the butterfly valves on carburettors. That practicality disappeared with the advent of digital fuel injection.

Digital fuel injection system wants a DIGITAL input. A value between 0 and 65000. The throttle pedal input is analogue. You can do the analogue to digital conversion anywhere you like. You could put a physical wire from the throttle pedal to the top of the engine somewhere and do the A to D conversion there, but it makes much more sense to do the conversion at the foot pedal and send the signals over the CANBus.

Robrowdy said:
What would happen if it decided to just go full open throttle on its own? You think there was any thought of safety on this?
Yes. They specifically designed it to default to off. When did you last hear of anyone's throttle jamming wide open? It used to be fairly common with older cars with sticky throttle cables, but it just doesn't happen anymore. You could hack the system and over-ride the control electronics but that would be just that, someone over-riding the safety control electronics.

Robrowdy said:
Doesn't seem to be anymore I mean just look at all the problems associated with "new technology". Ya its all cool and neato and stuff but just opens doors to worlds of new problems like ones that get peeps killed.
People have been dying ever since people. People die in many, many, different ways. Smoking, drinking, drugs, extreme sports. Most people die driving because they f*** up behind the wheel. The guy who died in the Tesla that was driving itself wasn't in control of the car. He was watching a movie. If he'd been driving, he probably would be alive today. It's not the technology that's bad, it's the people who use it. Overall, I'd rather take my chances in a Mercedes than most other cars. Mercedes pretty much invented all the safety devices on modern cars, active and passive, and they're pretty safe places to be.

Robrowdy said:
Settle out of court, make some changes (at the beta testers tragic expense), and its all good in the manufacturing world again. "Cheaper to make" (more profit for them), "cheaper to fix" (not my experience with Mercedes), its hard for me to laugh at one of the biggest legal rackets of all time (automotive industry) that is backed by one of the biggest thugs on the planet.
Yes, well..... I'll get my coat.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top