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Just wondering if anyone has had experience with running the car without the belly pan plastic fairing under the car? My thought was that this might improve airflow through the IC (at the expense of high speed aerodynamics). Since this is a California car where temps are high and top speeds low, would there be any cooling benefit? Appreciate your thoughts....
 

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Just wondering if anyone has had experience with running the car without the belly pan plastic fairing under the car? My thought was that this might improve airflow through the IC (at the expense of high speed aerodynamics). Since this is a California car where temps are high and top speeds low, would there be any cooling benefit? Appreciate your thoughts....
I don't think removing this pan is a good idea.
First and most important it protects your engine, alternator and other stuff from water damage that may occur during driving in the rain.
Second, you'll get more dust under your hood and you'll see it over time :D
This car is engineered cleverly enough to handle heat. I live in Texas, Houston and it's a blazing hot out here... During the days thermometer reaches 102 but it feels like 110! My car is black, and I always keep it outside, and I'm sure it gets like 120 on its surface. My sensor reads 115-118 when I start it. One can cook an egg on the hood or roof :D
My best suggestion is to change your coolant on a regular basis, every 3 years, or 40,000 miles... if you drive it in 3 years =)
Check coolant level from time to time. BE CAREFUL NOT TO OPEN THE CAP WHEN THE CAR WAS RUNNING AND IS HOT!!!!!
Regular oil changes with oil filters, check serpentine belts (both of them) to be sure =)
 

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Just wondering if anyone has had experience with running the car without the belly pan plastic fairing under the car? My thought was that this might improve airflow through the IC (at the expense of high speed aerodynamics). Since this is a California car where temps are high and top speeds low, would there be any cooling benefit? Appreciate your thoughts....
No, bad idea. It will not help engine cooling at all. The heat exchangers for engine coolant and intake air are located at the front of the car. They get all the air they need. Also, the intercooler pump is sized to move coolant through that system at a designed rate in order to optimize heat transfer. Testing has shown that a higher capacity pump can either have no effect or reduce the capacity of the system to shed heat because the coolant moves through the exchanger too quickly. Backyard engineers are not going to trump factory engineers by removing a few screws. You can however expose your under-car components to damage in a heartbeat and create lift.
 

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Don't do it!

No, bad idea. It will not help engine cooling at all. The heat exchangers for engine coolant and intake air are located at the front of the car. They get all the air they need. Also, the intercooler pump is sized to move coolant through that system at a designed rate in order to optimize heat transfer. Testing has shown that a higher capacity pump can either have no effect or reduce the capacity of the system to shed heat because the coolant moves through the exchanger too quickly. Backyard engineers are not going to trump factory engineers by removing a few screws. You can however expose your under-car components to damage in a heartbeat and create lift.
Some of the finest auto engineers in the world designed your car don't ever think you are going to out-do them!
 
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